ATCM
Antarctic Treaty
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Party: Brazil
2012/2013 Pre-Season Information
Station Report
Vessels Report
Aircrat Report
Research Rockets Report
Military
Vessel-Based Report
Operational Information - Non Governmental Expeditions - Vessel-Based Operations
No new information have been provided during the reported period.

Land-Based Operations
Operational Information - Non Governmental Expeditions - Land-Based Operations
No new information have been provided during the reported period.

Denial of Authorizations
Area Protection and Management Report
Environmental Information - Area Protection and Management
ASPA: Number:  112    Name:  Coppermine Peninsula, Robert Island, South Shetland Islands  (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 4
Permit Period: From:  27 Nov 2012   To:  17 Dec 2012
Purpose: The main factors driving the decreases of many antarctic birds populations are the enhancing of human activity on sea and continent. This factor affect species that require specifics environment conditions, as Sterna vittata and Macronectes giganteus, while generalist species as Catharacta skua and Pygoscelis adeliae, have showed population increases. Antarctic seabirds are top predators and hence are good indicators of lower trophic levels and, consequently, of alterations on environment and habitat quality. How exactly that alterations affect habitats, environments, behavior and movements of birds is not clearly understood. The continuing monitoring is justified by reviewing of past information and thematic maps reevaluating bird distribution with data sampled of 1984. Thus, shifts in nesting ground area and flotation’s population will be detected. Changes drove by human impact will also be measured.
Summary of activities: Identification and counting of seabird population are to be conducted. Identification by sight and with binoculars depending on species and environment conditions. Quantitative evaluation will be conduced at ice-free areas through land permanence by short periods. Quantitative evaluation will follow techniques proposed by CEMP (CCAMLR Ecosystem Monitoring Program), Standard Methods (2004).All information about breeding colony and nest distribution may be signed in geographic letters through specialized softwares. For such, we intend to register, by GPS receptor, the colonies edges and nest distribution. The samplings will be conduced at all icefree areas where there are birds in breed.
Event or project name/number: Impact of Global Change on Antarctic Environment, Flotation and Distribution of Bird Populations
ASPA: Number:  125    Name:  Fildes Peninsula, King George Island (25 de Mayo) (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 4
Permit Period: From:  01 Feb 2013   To:  05 Mar 2013
Purpose: The project "Plant communities from ice-areas of Antarctica" was proposed to describe, map and monitor the evolution of plant communities in ice-free areas, aiming to infer about their relationships with the microbial communities and greenhouse gases emission from the soils related. With the data obtained we expect to contribute with the monitoring of Antarctic ecosystems, deicing areas assessing potential for environmental impacts associated with the human occupation or natural phenomena. The use of "plant biodiversity" as an indicator of environmental impacts, as based on the fact that most plants that grow in ice-free areas of Antarctica can be classified into ornitocroprophilus or ornitocoprophobous. Soon, all changes that occur in bird populations will be reflected in the biodiversity of plant communities. The use of "cover" as an indicator, due to the fact that changes are modifiyng the global ice cover in Antarctica, contributing to changing environments and expansion of ice-free areas. For the proposed objectives be fullfilled, the research on each plant community begins with the identification of species whose data will be used to establish the floristic composition and offer the same conditions to achieve the phytosociological studies. With the data obtained will be possible to identify, locate and describe each plant formation and every community. Through georeferencing of each community will be possible to prepare thematic maps of vegetation, which can be compared with those developed in the period 1995-2012, for adjoining areas to the Admiralty Bay,área and other island from South Shetlands Archipelago. The results will be allow the assessment of the evolution of each community, and contribute to building methodologies for monitoring plant communities of ice-free areas. This project is supported by the Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antártico de Pesquisas Ambientais- INCT-APA, Module 2, which is being financed by MCT, MMA, CNPq and FAPERJ.
Summary of activities: - Mapping vegetation and phytosociological survey in Fields Peninsula - Collection of plants (flowering plants, liverworts, mosses, fungi and lichens) for identification in the laboratory and molecular analyzes (in this case the samples are preserved in silica gel); ca 100 gr for each species. - Collecting soil samples to represent the microbial diversity associated plant communities surveyed (approx 250g of soil sampled in each community) - Collecting water samples from lakes near Penguin Ridge for identification of diatom algae
Event or project name/number: Plant Communities from ice-free areas of Antarctica
ASPA: Number:  126    Name:  Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 5
Permit Period: From:  01 Nov 2012   To:  31 Dec 2012
Purpose: This project aims to diagnose diversity, distribution and life cycle of seaweeds and epi-endophytic fungi from midlitoral and shallow sublitoral areas from Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent archipelago, associating these data with abiotic, biochemical and microbiological indicators of water quality.
Summary of activities: Samples (n=6) of distinct species (20-50 spp.) of seaweeds will be collected using spatula in the intertidal area. In the shallow subtidal area sampling will be performed using a Van Veen grabber (opening of 30 cm, without trawling). Tree sampling transects on intertidal area (500 m long each) from the rocky beach, parallel and transversal to the coastal line, will be traveled walking inside ASPA 140 (Ilha Deception, subareas: around Fumarole Bay; Telephone Bay; Pendulum Cove; and Whalers Bay). During this OPERANTAR, will be hurled ROV for images capture, the equipment will operate using ship DP (dymanic positioning system) and no contact with bottom substrate will occur, nor sample collection will be performed using this device. Dynamic positioning (DP) is a computer controlled system to automatically maintain a vessel's position and heading by using its own propellers and thrusters. Position reference sensors, combined with wind sensors, motion sensors and gyro compasses, provide information to the computer pertaining to the vessel's position and the magnitude and direction of environmental forces affecting its position or its programmed position.
Event or project name/number: Biodiversity and distribution of seaweeds and marine fungi, associated with abiotic, biochemical and
ASPA: Number:  126    Name:  Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 6
Permit Period: From:  01 Nov 2012   To:  01 Dec 2012
Purpose: HOLOANTAR is a multidisciplinary project in which researchers from the University of Lisbon (Portugal) and the Federal University of Viçosa (Brasil) lead research activities in collaboration with other investigators from the Universidad of la República (Uruguay), University of Alcalá (Spain) and also from several Spanish research centres (Centro de Estudios y Experimentación de Obras Publicas, Instituto Geológico y Minero de España, Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes, Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera and Parque Natural De Peñalara) The project is led by the Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning - Centre for Geographical Studies of the University of Lisbon through the research group Antarctic Environments and Climate Change Research Group (ANTECC). Results of HOLOANTAR project will contribute to the understanding of the landscape evolution and climate changes in the South Shetlands Islands following Holocene environmental evolution in Byers Peninsula (Livingston, Antarctica). The South Shetlands Islands are located in the northwestern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the Earth's regions that have experienced a stronger warming signal during the second half of the 20th century. In the ice-free areas of this archipelago islands the terrestrial ecosystem is supported by permafrost, one of the key components of the cryosphere as recently defined by the World Climate Research Programme, though its reaction to climate change is still poorly known. However, in the recent years a very important effort took place to monitor the thermal state and characteristics of permafrost in order to study its response to the recent warming trend. Our team is involved on several of these longterm monitoring projects (PERMANTAR, PERMANTAR-2), but HOLOANTAR, in addition, offers a new integrated approach aiming to bridge the gap between contemporary and past changes in permafrost environments. HOLOANTAR is based on two main hypotheses: a) A multi-proxy analysis of lake sediments will allow reconstructing the palaeoecological evolution in the Maritime Antarctic and the role played in it by permafrost and active layer dynamics, b) The detection of activity rates, spatial patterns and geographical controls of contemporary key-geomorphic processes and permafrost distribution, will allow defining their limiting climatic conditions that will be used to interpret the sedimentary record.
Summary of activities: 1- Lake sampling Between 8th November and 3-4th December members of HOLOANTAR will be working mostly in the collection of sediments from several lakes. To achieve this goal we will use the ice (which is expected to be at least ~50 cm thick) as the drilling platform from which the drillings will be performed. Lakes to be sampled have been selected according to the following criteria: deglaciation gradient E-W from Rotch Dome glacier to West Coast; altitude, distance to sea coast; watershed characteristics (area, geomorphology, relief); ice-cover period length; lake size/volume/depth; and limnological data available. By studying several lakes in different locations using a highresolution multiproxy approach, we will obtain a wide knowledge of past environmental changes and better understand how climate has conditioned glacial/periglacial processes in Byers. To collect longer sediment cores, an Uwitec Piston Corer will be used to reach the diamicton at the deepest part of the lake. A gravity type corer (Glew) will be used to collect good surface sediment profiles (to be sliced at higher resolution to study recent history). Sediment cores will be described visually and photographed in the Base Camp before storing and conservation within plastic PVC liners and sealed hermetically to avoid humidity losses during transporting. The equipment necessary for this lake coring system is very heavy, that’s why we will require the assistance of the Brazilian Antarctic program that will facilitate the logistics carrying the equipment to the field sites by helicopter. At least 3 days/lake will be necessary to transport the equipment to the lake by helicopter and/or human-drawn snow sleds, to assemble the corer on the ice cover, to make holes through the lake ice cover, to collect the sediment cores and take down all the equipment. The lakes to be sampled are (numbering corresponds to the lakes in the map): · Chester Cone Lake (nº 4) · Lago Escondido (nº 12) · Lago Las Palmas (nº 14) · Lago Domo (nº 8) · Cerro Negro (nº 7) · Midge Lake (nº 3) · Lago Åsa (nº 13) From each lake a total of four cores will be collected: - 2 cores with a Piston corer. - 2 cores with the Kayak corer. Water samples in each lake will be taken for dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and analyzing the isotopic composition to interpret the different sources and transformations of this compound. And multiprobe profiles in the water column of each lake will be measured in the deepest part of the lake for pH, Tª, dissolved oxygen and conductivity data at a 0,5 m intervals. 2- Geomorpholological monitoring Geomorphological monitoring activities will be included in the international ANTPAS-IPA geomorphic process monitoring network and will provide long-term data to study the reaction of landscape dynamics to changes in climate and ground temperatures. The objective is to identify the influence of climate conditions on geomorphological rates, so that we can evaluate palaeodynamics and assess on future changes. I will set up stakes (wooden, 50 cm length, 3 cm wide) at different elevations to identify the climate and movement rates of these processes regarding the altitude. Control of ground movement will be done using a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS). Stakes will be installed in three different lake watersheds (West- Centre-East of the Peninsula). In each of the watersheds, three sites will be installed in locations with different altitude, aspect, slope, etc. One monitoring site: 5 stakes. In each lake catchment: 5 * 3 sites = 15 stakes. Three catchments: 15 stakes * catchments = 45 stakes in total. In late November we will install all the stakes in the slopes and in late December the researcher Miguel Ángel de Pablo (University of Alcalá) will stay one week in Byers (framed within the Spanish Antarctic campaign) and will make the DGPS measurements of the stakes. 3- Cosmogenic datings Measurements of cosmog
Event or project name/number: HOLOANTAR - Holocene environmental change in the Maritime Antarctic. Interactions between permafrost

ASPA: Number:  128    Name:  Western shore of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 9
Permit Period: From:  27 Nov 2012   To:  01 Feb 2013
Purpose: The main factors driving the decreases of many antarctic bird populations are the enhancing of human activity on sea and continent. This factor affect species that require specifics environmente conditions, as Sterna vittata and Macronectes giganteus, while generalist species as Catharacta skua and Pygoscelis adeliae, have showed population increases. Antarctic seabirds are top predators and hence are good indicators of lower trophic levels and, consequently, of alterations on environment and habitat quality. How exactly that alterations affect habitats, environments, behavior and dislodgement of birds is not clearly understood. The continuing monitoring is justified by reevaluation of past information and thematic maps reevaluating bird distribution with data sapled by REDE 2 (biological, chemical, and physical parameters). Thus, shifts in nesting ground area and flotation’s population will be detected. Changes drove by human impact will also be measured.
Summary of activities: Identification and counting of seabird population are to be conducted. Identification by sight and with binoculars depending on species and environment conditions. Quantitative evaluation will be conduced at ice-free areas through land permanence by short periods. Quantitative evaluation and breeding success will follow techniques proposed by CEMP (CCAMLR Ecosystem Monitoring Program), Standard Methods (2004). All information about breeding colony and nest distribution may be signed in geographic letters through specialized softwares. For such, we intend to register, by GPS receptor, the colonies edges, nest distribution and demarcate the moulting and feeding grounds of birds. The samplings will be conduced at all ice-free areas where there are birds in breed.
Event or project name/number: Impact of Global Change on Antarctic Environment, Flotation and Distribution of Bird Populations
ASPA: Number:  128    Name:  Western shore of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 5
Permit Period: From:  08 Jan 2013   To:  04 Feb 2013
Purpose: The project "Plant communities from ice-areas of Antarctica" was proposed to describe, map and monitor the evolution of plant communities in ice-free areas, aiming to infer about their relationships with the microbial communities and greenhouse gases emission from the soils related. With the data obtained we expect to contribute with the monitoring of Antarctic ecosystems, deicing areas assessing potential for environmental impacts associated with the human occupation or natural phenomena. The use of "plant biodiversity" as an indicator of environmental impacts, as based on the fact that most plants that grow in ice-free areas of Antarctica can be classified into ornitocroprophilus or ornitocoprophobous. Soon, all changes that occur in bird populations will be reflected in the biodiversity of plant communities. The use of "cover" as an indicator, due to the fact that changes are modifiyng the global ice cover in Antarctica, contributing to changing environments and expansion of ice-free areas. For the proposed objectives be fullfilled, the research on each plant community begins with the identification of species whose data will be used to establish the floristic composition and offer the same conditions to achieve the phytosociological studies. With the data obtained will be possible to identify, locate and describe each plant formation and every community. Through georeferencing of each community will be possible to prepare thematic maps of vegetation, which can be compared with those developed in the period 1995-2012, for adjoining areas to the Admiralty Bay,área and other island from South Shetlands Archipelago. The results will be allow the assessment of the evolution of each community, and contribute to building methodologies for monitoring plant communities of ice-free areas. This project is supported by the Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia Antártico de Pesquisas Ambientais- INCT-APA, Module 2, which is being financed by MCT, MMA, CNPq and FAPERJ.
Summary of activities: - Mapping vegetation and phytosociological survey in Rakusa Point, Thomas Point, Jasnorzewski Gardens, Panorama Ridge, Cliff Skua, Jardine Peaks, Jersak Hills, Hills Italian Kasprowy Valley, Dutkiewicz Creek, Breecia Crag, adjacent to the Ecology Glacier, Ornithologist Creek, Llano Point, adjacencies Station Pieter Lenie "Copacabana," Sphinx Hill, Agat Point, Demay Peninsula and Uchacta Point. - Collection of plants (flowering plants, liverworts, mosses, fungi and lichens) for identification in the laboratory and molecular analyzes (in this case the samples are preserved in silica gel); ca 100 gr for each species. - Collecting soil samples to represent the microbial diversity associated plant communities surveyed (approx 250g of soil sampled in each community) - Collecting water samples from lakes near Penguin Ridge for identification of diatom algae
Event or project name/number: Plant Communities from ice-free areas of Antarctica
ASPA: Number:  128    Name:  Western shore of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 9
Permit Period: From:  01 Dec 2012   To:  31 Mar 2013
Purpose: The extreme conditions of Polar Regions, may influence physiological, reproductive and behavioral characteristics of the species living in those habitats. Seabirds are considered good indicators of the environmental contamination because they are the top of the food chain and can indicate clearly the pollutants bioaccumulation. Non invasive techniques (as for example the use of feathers) to determine the presence of micropollutants or the stress levels, are being widely applied. This is due to the fact that techniques that use non invasive sampling methods reduce the animals handling period, and thus the stress caused by this manipulation. And most important, because they offer an alternative to the animals sacrifice in situations when it is difficult to find dead specimens and enough tissue to enable those analysis. The main objective of this project is to apply non invasive techniques to determine the presence of persistent organic pollutants, mercury, cadmium and selenium using feathers, as well the levels of stress (through the quantification of corticosterone in faeces) of two skuas (Catharacta maccormicki and C. lonnbergii) and three penguin species (Pygoscelis Antarctica, P. papua and P. adeliae) that breed at the Admiralty Bay (King George Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica). The integration of different research groups (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, German and Spain) in different areas of knowledge will allow help understanding the ecology of the studied species, especially in relation to environmental contamination and stress levels. The information generated by this project will enable conservation policies directed to those populations and the communities and environments in which they are inserted, as we learn more about the response of those organisms to the environmental changes.
Summary of activities: All Skuas’ breeding sites and nests, as well as all Penguins’ breeding colonies encountered will be registered with the use of a GPS (Datun WGS 84). No capture activities will be done near the breeding colonies during the reproductive period, when eggs and young birds are present in the area. The capture activities will be done only during the last period of research in Antarctica, with only 10 specimens of each species being captured. It is important to notice that from mid-February the penguins chicks and adults are no longer in the breeding sites, been found in the adjacent areas in the molt process (nurseries areas). We request permission to take egg measurements, including here the measurement of the temperature to verify the viability of eggs. This will permit the collection of unviable eggs for the analysis provided in the project. These measures will only take place in the nests at the periphery of the colonies so as to avoid behavioral changes that may negatively influence the reproductive success of animals. Only one researcher will approach the colony to take the measures. All techniques, from the capture methods (netting for penguins and snare trap for the skuas), banding methods, as well as weighing (with balance dynamometer, Pesola), morphometric measurements (high precision caliper), will obey to the norms internationally established by CCAMLR (2004, Standard Methods). Adult birds will be inspected to verify the existence of ectoparasites and feather conditions, and records of health conditions recorded in specific spreadsheet. Breast and wing feathers of each captured individual will be collected (approximately 5g). Also, penguins and skuas excreta (feces), pellets (post-feeding, voluntarily regurgitated material), and spontaneous regurgitation will be collected from captured birds. Additional authorization is requested for the collection of 2 ml of blood samples from the penguins captured and 1 ml of blood samples of skuas for stress analysis, sex determination by other non-destructive methods, and also for the Avian Influenza project. Eggs found outside the nests will be collected (for a maximum of 30 per species) and also eggshells from predated or hatched eggs. Five cm3 of the breeding grounds soil will be collected in at least 10 points of penguins’ breeding colonies (one colony per species) and five skuas’ breeding areas (total of 25 samples). In case the research group finds bird carcasses small amounts of fat or muscle tissue will be collected (approximately 5 g, at most 25 samples of this material, 5 per species studied).
Event or project name/number: Bioecological Studies in Penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica, P. papua and P. adeliae) and Skuas (Cathar
ASPA: Number:  140    Name:  Parts of Deception Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 6
Permit Period: From:  18 Mar 2013   To:  28 Mar 2013
Purpose: This project aims to study the micro-scale interactions between the ocean, the coastal zone and the atmosphere at the Deception Island, South Shetland Archipelago, Antarctica. The strong heating of the coastal waters of the Southern Ocean found at the semi-enclosed bay in the island has important impacts on locally modulating the heat fluxes at the air-sea interface, on the adjacent open ocean and also on the coastal regions of the island. The project has a strong instrumentation component, specially that made in Brazil, and has a strong motivation based upon the complete lack of data related to the subject collected by Brazilian researchers at this specific region of the Southern Ocean. The geotectonic environment affects the water masses characteristics and the ocean circulation in the interior of Port Foster (Deception Island’s semi-enclosed bay). That, as a consequence, affects the atmosphere by affecting the turbulent fluxes and the coastal zone through modification on the ocean currents, waves and tides regime. By using different methodologies including the launching of instruments in the water and at the beach, beach measurements with sediment collection and numerical modelling, the project aims to obtain and analyze time series of both meteorological and oceanographic data from November 2012 (Brazilian Antarctic Operation 31 – OP31). Following appropriated methods, the project will study the ocean-atmosphere and the ocean-coastline interactions by using direct measurements taken by instruments to be installed at the beach and in the sea (inside Port Foster Bay) and by taking measurements of the beach morphology to be performed at specific places along the beach by experimented scientists.
Summary of activities: The main activity to be performed by the Project at the Deception Island is the mooring of the meteo-oceanographic buoy which will be used to automatically collect data about the atmosphere and the ocean at shallow waters (20 to 30 m) inside Port Foster Bay. This buoy was completely built and integrated with sensors in Brazil. The buoy is a 2 m diameter, toroid-type with several oceanographic and meteorological sensors. The buoy weights about 700 kg. Owing to that we will need the ship’s winch to lift and anchor the buoy. We will also need the support from a Zodiac boat available from the Brazilian Polar Vessel Alm. Maxiamiano. This activity is scheduled to last for 2 (two) days during the parallel activity of setting up the camping which will also occur during the field work. Two ADPs will be used to make the current profile measurements in shallowWaters close to where the meteo-oceanographic buoys will be deployed. In order to properly anchor these equipments we will need support from a Zodiac boat. The ADPs and their anchoring systems weight altogether about 45 kg. The anchoring system is made of a conical structure built in stainless steel and concrete with a diameter of about 80 cm. In order to measure the surface currents in Port Foster we will launch and recover 6 (six) surface floats from the ship. The instruments weight about 26 kg and are easily handable being cylindrical with a diameter of about 0,5 m. The tracking of these instruments will be made using radio-transmission and GPS techniques. Receiving antennas will be installed close to the planned camping during the measurement phase which will be performed in two days. The work involving the beach dynamics should be made in the deception island at places close to the area chosen for the hidrodynamical survey performed by the surface floats, the ADPs and the meteo-oceanographic buoy. In order to perform the beach morphology survey we will need a trained person walking along the beach at some selected sites with a GPS. These walks will be made at transects displaced across the beach from the wave breaking zone up to about 400 m inshore. The sedimentary analysis will be made by collecting 100 samples along 4 transects at the beach. These samples will be sediments weighting about 300 g which will be placed into plastic bags and properly identified to be taken back to Brazil. In Brazil we will make the granulometric and mineralogical analysis of these samples. The synoptic profiling of atmospherical physical parameters will be made by radiosondes to be launched from the ship using balloons. Once flying, these radiosondes measure the atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity and wind velocity data and transmit these data to a receiving antenna installed onboard the ship. These data allow us to asess the vertical profile of the atmosphere. The equipment to be used includes: a Vaisala Digicora II MW-15 system used to the reception and processing of radiosonde data; a portable UHF antenna CG 25, GPS antenna; a ground check system used to calibrate the radiosondes before launching. Other atmospheric variables are estimated from the original data collected by the radiosondes. IMPORTANT OBSERVATION: In order to launch the meteo-oceanographic buoy into the sea in Port Foster we will need to make use of the lateral winch of the Polar Ship Alm. Maximiano. The buoy, owing to its size and weight, should be transported in the ship in an area close to the winch.
Event or project name/number: INTERCEPTION – OCEAN, COSTAL ZONE AND ATMOSPHERE MICRO-SCALE INTERACTIONS AT THE DECEPTION ISLAND, S

ASPA: Number:  140    Name:  Parts of Deception Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 14
Permit Period: From:  02 Nov 2012   To:  18 Nov 2012
Purpose: This project aims to study the micro-scale interactions between the ocean, the coastal zone and the atmosphere at the Deception Island, South Shetland Archipelago, Antarctica. The strong heating of the coastal waters of the Southern Ocean found at the semi-enclosed bay in the island has important impacts on locally modulating the heat fluxes at the air-sea interface, on the adjacent open ocean and also on the coastal regions of the island. The project has a strong instrumentation component, specially that made in Brazil, and has a strong motivation based upon the complete lack of data related to the subject collected by Brazilian researchers at this specific region of the Southern Ocean. The geotectonic environment affects the water masses characteristics and the ocean circulation in the interior of Port Foster (Deception Island’s semi-enclosed bay). That, as a consequence, affects the atmosphere by affecting the turbulent fluxes and the coastal zone through modification on the ocean currents, waves and tides regime. By using different methodologies including the launching of instruments in the water and at the beach, beach measurements with sediment collection and numerical modelling, the project aims to obtain and analyze time series of both meteorological and oceanographic data from November 2012 (Brazilian Antarctic Operation 31 – OP31). Following appropriated methods, the project will study the ocean-atmosphere and the ocean-coastline interactions by using direct measurements taken by instruments to be installed at the beach and in the sea (inside Port Foster Bay) and by taking measurements of the beach morphology to be performed at specific places along the beach by experimented scientists.
Summary of activities: The main activity to be performed by the Project at the Deception Island is the mooring of the meteo-oceanographic buoy which will be used to automatically collect data about the atmosphere and the ocean at shallow waters (20 to 30 m) inside Port Foster Bay. This buoy was completely built and integrated with sensors in Brazil. The buoy is a 2 m diameter, toroid-type with several oceanographic and meteorological sensors. The buoy weights about 700 kg. Owing to that we will need the ship’s winch to lift and anchor the buoy. We will also need the support from a Zodiac boat available from the Brazilian Polar Vessel Alm. Maxiamiano. This activity is scheduled to last for 2 (two) days during the parallel activity of setting up the camping which will also occur during the field work. Two ADPs will be used to make the current profile measurements in shallow Waters close to where the meteo-oceanographic buoys will be deployed. In order to properly anchor these equipments we will need support from a Zodiac boat. The ADPs and their anchoring systems weight altogether about 45 kg. The anchoring system is made of a conical structure built in stainless steel and concrete with a diameter of about 80 cm. In order to measure the surface currents in Port Foster we will launch and recover 6 (six) surface floats from the ship. The instruments weight about 26 kg and are easily handable being cylindrical with a diameter of about 0,5 m. The tracking of these instruments will be made using radio-transmission and GPS techniques. Receiving antennas will be installed close to the planned camping during the measurement phase which will be performed in two days. The work involving the beach dynamics should be made in the deception island at places close to the area chosen for the hidrodynamical survey performed by the surface floats, the ADPs and the meteo-oceanographic buoy. In order to perform the beach morphology survey we will need a trained person walking along the beach at some selected sites with a GPS. These walks will be made at transects displaced across the beach from the wave breaking zone up to about 400 m inshore. The sedimentary analysis will be made by collecting 100 samples along 4 transects at the beach. These samples will be sediments weighting about 300 g which will be placed into plastic bags and properly identified to be taken back to Brazil. In Brazil we will make the granulometric and mineralogical analysis of these samples. The synoptic profiling of atmospherical physical parameters will be made by radiosondes to be launched from the ship using balloons. Once flying, these radiosondes measure the atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity and wind velocity data and transmit these data to a receiving antenna installed onboard the ship. These data allow us to asess the vertical profile of the atmosphere. The equipment to be used includes: a Vaisala Digicora II MW-15 system used to the reception and processing of radiosonde data; a portable UHF antenna CG 25, GPS antenna; a ground check system used to calibrate the radiosondes before launching. Other atmospheric variables are estimated from the original data collected by the radiosondes. IMPORTANT OBSERVATION: In order to launch the meteo-oceanographic buoy into the sea in Port Foster we will need to make use of the lateral winch of the Polar Ship Alm. Maximiano. The buoy, owing to its size and weight, should be transported in the ship in an area close to the winch.
Event or project name/number: INTERCEPTION – OCEAN, COSTAL ZONE AND ATMOSPHERE MICRO-SCALE INTERACTIONS AT THE DECEPTION ISLAND, S
ASPA: Number:  140    Name:  Parts of Deception Island, South Shetland Islands (More Details)
Permit Number:
Number of people permitted: 5
Permit Period: From:  01 Nov 2012   To:  31 Dec 2012
Purpose: This project aims to diagnose diversity, distribution and life cycle of seaweeds and epi-endophytic fungi from midlitoral and shallow sublitoral areas from Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent archipelago, associating these data with abiotic, biochemical and microbiological indicators of water quality.
Summary of activities: Samples (n=6) of distinct species (20-50 spp.) of seaweeds will be collected using spatula in the intertidal area. In the shallow subtidal area sampling will be performed using a Van Veen grabber (opening of 30 cm, without trawling). Tree sampling transects on intertidal area (500 m long each) from the rocky beach, parallel and transversal to the coastal line, will be traveled walking inside ASPA 140 (Ilha Deception, subareas: around Fumarole Bay; Telephone Bay; Pendulum Cove; and Whalers Bay). During this OPERANTAR, will be hurled ROV for images capture, the equipment will operate using ship DP (dymanic positioning system) and no contact with bottom substrate will occur, nor sample collection will be performed using this device. Dynamic positioning (DP) is a computer controlled system to automatically maintain a vessel's position and heading by using its own propellers and thrusters. Position reference sensors, combined with wind sensors, motion sensors and gyro compasses, provide information to the computer pertaining to the vessel's position and the magnitude and direction of environmental forces affecting its position or its programmed position.
Event or project name/number: Biodiversity and distribution of seaweeds and marine fungi, associated with abiotic, biochemical and
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