ATCM
Antarctic Treaty
Electronic Information Exchange System

Party: Germany
2018/2019 Pre-Season Information
Station Report
Operational Information - National Expeditions - Stations
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: AFIN (Antarctic Fast Ice Network)
Type: Wintering
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: S. Arndt (AWI) In the framework of the Antarctic Fast Ice Network (AFIN) physical properties, thickness and extend of sea ice and its snow cover are determined over the entire Atka Bay. These measurements are performed each year since 2010. The work will be performed mainly and as a matter of routine by the wintering team of the Neumayer station. The measurements in the Atka Bay provide the German contribution to the international sea ice program AFIN. Extensive reports and results can be found under http://epic.awi.de/ (for example Hoppmann et al., 2012, http://epic.awi.de/30991/). The planned measurements contain a large variety of methods: 1) Snow and Ice thicknesses: The thicknesses of snow and ice are measured manually by drillings and with electromagnetic noninvasive methods. For this, repeated measurements are performed at defined stations on the ice as well as along transects over the sea ice. In addition, the thickness of the platelet ice layer (loose ice platelets, accumulating under sea ice) is determined. 2) Weather/ Radiation station: The weather and radiation conditions are registered with an automatic station deployed on the sea ice. These stations are regularly maintained through the season. 3) Thermistor buoy: The mass balance of the sea ice is measured with an autonomous thermistor chain. It records temperature and thermal conductivity from air, snow, sea ice and water. The data are transferred directly to Bremerhaven. When the sea ice breaks out, the buoy will drift from Atka Bay towards the Weddell Sea. 4) Snow buoys: This system measures the development of the snow thickness. Four ultrasonic sensors send in intervals a weak impulse whose echo will be determined. From the elapsed time of the signal the distance to the snow surface will be measured. 5) Ice cores: Temperature, texture and salinity of the sea ice will be determined by drilling ice cores during end of the measurement season. Some measurements will be performed directly on the ice, additional cores will be transported to Bremerhaven for further analysis and for archiving. 6) Snow pits: Snow pits are used to determine the properties of snow at selected stations on the sea ice. 7) GPS station: The movement of the ice shelf and mainly the evolution of the snow thickness and snow properties will be determined with a high-precision GPS receiver
Name: Activities at Neumayer: Salad machine
Type: Wintering
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: D. Schubert (DLR) To supplement the research and food production activities of the EDEN ISS greenhouse container, a small-scale plant production facility ('salad machine') was built up for operation within the Neumayer Station III. This facility will be used to grow lettuce in semi-closed growth chamber, employing soilless growth techniques and under LED lighting. The plant salad machine is producing approximately 1.2 kg of lettuce (edible biomass) per week, while using only ca. 150 W of power and generating ca. 15 L of wastewater per week. It is a very small plant growth chamber measures 125 x 65 x 120 cm (L x W x H). The greenhouse will be operated by the overwintering team of the NM-III and supported by the EDEN team in Bremen.
Name: Activities at O'Higgins Station: Operations of Antarctic research station GARS O'Higgins
Type: Wintering
Location:
Site Name: Chilean base Bernardo O’Higgins (Plateau Laclavere)   Lat: 63º 19´ 00´´ S   Long: 57º 54´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 14
Medical Facilities: hospital at O'Higgins Station
Remarks / Description: PI: E. Diedrich (DLR) The scientific long-term observations of the last 27 years shall be continued. In particular spaceborne SAR data providing insights into ice mass balance, ice dynamics and ice shelf disintegration of the Antarctic shall be received by GARS O’Higgins ground station. In general, research related to system Earth shall be supported by SAR data reception (e.g. of TanDEM-X mission), by providing TT&C support for scientific satellite missions like TanDEM-X, TerraSAR-X, FireBird, Cassiope and NEOSSat, and by VLBI, GNSS and gravimeter observations. In addition, Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) support is planned for Eu:CROPIS. The main mission running at GARS O’Higgins is DLR’s TanDEM-X mission, which uses two X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites, TSX-1 and TDX-1. The two satellites fly in close formation in orbit around the earth and to do this safely they require TT&C support from GARS O’Higgins. The high resolution SAR images acquired by these satellites, which are received at GARS O’Higgins, are used for a wide range of scientific purposes. One of the primary aims of TanDEM-X is to produce accurate global elevation models with a 12m spatial resolution and a relative vertical accuracy better than two meters, including Antarctica. GARS O’Higgins is one of the two core ground stations around the world used to downlink the huge amount of SAR data being acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. GARS O’Higgins also supports geodetic research, including Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) using the 9-meter antenna as a radio telescope and taking permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements for the German Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG). GARS O’Higgins is network station of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), of the International GNSS Service (IGS), and of the “Cooperative Network for GIOVE Observations” (CONGO). The data is used to measure the tectonic movement of the Antarctic Peninsula, to realize the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) and the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS), to derive Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP), and to support radio astronomy research like the TANAMI project (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry). As part of this support for the BKG, the station also operated an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) collecting air temperature, pressure, humidity and wind direction and velocity. Project “APHYCA GARS O‘Higgins”, Dr. Bernd Krock, AWI This study is a continuation of the work. The goal of this study is the deveolpment of a long-term monitoring system to detect changes in the phytoplankton communities in Antarctica. To do so, it is planned to define suitable chemotaxonomic markers for different plankton classes. Passive samplers will be developed in the direct vicinity of GARS O'Higgins (max 100m away from the coast) to retrieve samples, which will be packed and shipped to Germany for further investigations.
Name: Neumayer III Station
Type: Wintering
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: Expedition leader summer: Dr. Tim Heitland/Peter Köhler (AWI) The Neumayer Station III is the permanently occupied German research station located at the north-west edge of the Ekström Ice Shelf in Dronning Maud Land. The station is operated by the Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI). The station continuously operates scientific observatories and is the operational base for aircraft missions and deep field traverses during summer season. The wintering staff is one station leader/physician, four scientists, three technicans and one cook. During summer season up to 50 scientists and technicans can be accomodated. Transport of personnel and equipment is performed via the airlink from Cape Town to Antarctica established in the frame of the international cooperation DronningMaud Land Air Network (DROMLAN). Eight to eleven intercontinental flights are performed from October until February every summer season. Regular supply of the station is performed by ship delivering consumables, maintainance material, heavy equipment such as vehicles, sledges etc. Two to three ship calls are performed every summer season. Permanent projects: Measurements of cosmic particles (PI: Walter (DESY)) Maintenance and operation of an automatic weather station (AWS) on Halvfarryggen (PI: D. Steinhage (AWI)) IsoANT (PI: M. Werner (AWI)) SPOT (D. Zitterbart, Ben Fabry (Uni Erlangen)) Maintenance and operation of an automatic weather station (AWS) on Sorasen (PI: Dr. H. Schmithüsen (AWI)) Weak signal propagation Beacon (WSPR) (PI: U. Walter, TU Munich) MICA-S (PI: T. Fromm, AWI) DROMSEIS (PI: A. Eckstaller, AWI) CHOICE (PI: A. Chouker, LMU Munich)

Name: Activities at Bellingshausen: Long term monitoring of seabirds and seals
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Bellingshausen Station (Russia)   Lat: 62º 11´ 46´´ S   Long: 58º 57´ 38´´ W  
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: H.-U. Peter (Uni Jena) 1. The aim of the project „Long term monitoring of Antarctic seabirds and seals on Fildes Peninsula, King George Island” is the continuation of the standardized assessment of the fauna of Fildes Peninsula, Ardley Island and adjacent islands and ice-free areas within the Maxwell Bay. (all participants) 2. Changes in the local distribution of the Antarctic hair grass Deschampsia antarctica on the Fildes Peninsula will be studied in with focus on glacier retreat zones. (C. Braun) 3. The aim of the project “Population ecology and migration of Antarctic skuas” on Fildes Peninsula is the continuation of the long-term project on the population ecology of both skua species and hybrid pairs. (M. Senf, A. Kessel)
Operating Period: From: November To: February
Name: Activities at Kohnen Station: ASTI
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Kohnen Station   Lat: 75º 00´ 00´´ S   Long: 00º 04´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population: 20
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: M. Hörhold (AWI) The stable water isotopes in ice cores are interpreted as a proxy for past air temperatures, they thus provide a key element of paleo-climate reconstructions from ice cores (EPICA, 2006). However, the interpretation of ice core records of stable water isotopes is today mostly limited by several factors: First, recent measurements of water vapour and its isotopic composition on board of Polar-stern within the Iso-Arc project reveal a strong depletion vapour above sea ice-covered areas. Furthermore, marine air over open water with isotopically enriched moisture might be pushed into the inland covered by air with depleted isotopic values (Kurita et al., 2016). Concurrent isotope measurements on board of Polarstern (project Iso-Arc), at Neumayer (IsoAnt) and at Kohnen (this project) will allow us to investigate the strength and transport of the different source signals to different sites of the Antarcic mainland. Second, is the large spatial-temporal variability observed in low accumulation sites, which creates a non-climatic high-frequency signal in single cores. Statistical approaches such as stacking of several cores addressed this issue based on data from previous campaigns at Kohnen station (Laepple et al. 2016, Münch et al., 2016). From these previous studies we could deduce spatial decorrelation lengths, which enable us to carefully choose the sampling scheme in order to be able to extract a regional climatic signal. Third, recent studies reveal a lack of understanding of post-depositional processes as they al-ter the link between snow isotopic composition and temperature (Casado et al., 2016). The exchange of water vapor between snow and atmosphere under the exceptionally cold and dry conditions at East Antarctic drilling sites significantly affect the isotopic composition of the snow (Steen-Larsen et al., 2014, Casado et al., 2016, Ritter et al., 2016). Casado et al., (2016) highlight the impact of snow metamorphism on the surface snow isotopic signal compared to the initial precipitation by showing the difference in the range of d18O values. Even more astonishing is the finding by Laepple et al. (2017) of a common 20 cm cycle in all analysed East Antactic drilling sites which cannot be attributed to the seasonal variability of precipitation (Laepple et al., 2017). Kohnen station is amongst the analysed sites showing a cyle of 19cm length in the d18O signal. The reason for this cycle is recently investigated, but the finding clearly documents the potential impact of post-depositional processes on the iso-topic composition of snow and the impact on the interpretation of ice core records. The field season activities with the project aim for the following goals: 1. Measurement of the isotopic composition of water vapour during the season in cooperation with Hans Christian Steen-Larsen, University of Bergen: to conduct this measurements a tower will raised on which inlets are installed to pump air into an instrument, which measures the stable water isotopic composition of the air. A comparable set-up is currently (temporarily) installed in Greenland at the East Greenland Deep ice core project site (see attachment figure 1). The instrument will be operated by power supply from Kohnen station. A tent will be set up next to the tower to host the instrument and calibration units. After finishing the meas-urements, all settings (tower, tent etc) will be completely removed, nothing will be left. 2. Continuous sampling of precipitating snow and surface snow during the season, in parallel to the water vapour measurements and in row to measurements of the previous years. For this a spatial sampling layout by bamboo poles will be set-up. The marked positions will be sampled daily/weekly from the very surface and from few cm below the surface. In order to collect the snow a spoon is used and the snow is sampled into plastic bags, which are sealed and shipped to Bremerhaven for analysis. A comparable layout from the Greenland EGRIP project is shown in the attachment (figure 2). For both, 1 and 2, the set up, measurements and snow sampling procedures do not disturb the environment. Albeit their simple efforts, the benefit of these data will be the continous and parallel record over the whole season, allowing to study the interaction of the air and the sur-face snow in terms of isotopic composition. 3. Sampling of 1 to 2 m long profiles using the carbon liners and repeating similar measure-ments in seasons 2013/14, 14/15, 15/16 an 16/17 at the same position to track the isotope profile with time. For this type of measurement carbon tubes are pushed into the snow and digged out. The snow profile collected with the tubes is stored in ice core boxes and shipped to Bremerhaven for analysis. The holes are filled with snow.
Operating Period: From: November To: January
Name: Activities at Kohnen Station: FIDEMEKO
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Kohnen Station   Lat: 75º 00´ 00´´ S   Long: 00º 04´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population: 20
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer Station
Remarks / Description: PI: D. Steinhage (AWI) FIDEMEKO 2018-2020 aims to measure in-situ firn densification rates at a cold, low-accumulation site (Kohnen Station) continuously over a time period of a year. This point measurement of firn densification rate at Kohnen Station is supposed to serve as a validation dataset for a continuum mechanical firn densification model solidFIDEMO, that is to be developed within a DFG SPP1158 proposal.
Operating Period: From: November To: February
Name: Activities at Kohnen Station: Kohnen QK
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Kohnen Station   Lat: 75º 00´ 00´´ S   Long: 00º 04´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population: 20
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: T. Laepple (AWI) Conclusions on climate variability and potential anthropogenic trends on the East Antarctic Plateau are limited because of the very low accumulation rate and spatially and temporally varying accumulation conditions. This project aims to systematically gather information on topography, accumulation conditions and spatial variations in the surface isotope signal for a quantitative reconstruction of the climate variability of the last millennium for the region around Kohnen. Specifically we will quantify the isotopic variability on regional (1-100km) scales, by means of systematic snow sampling along an approximately 100km long transect between Kohnen Station and the previous drilling site B31. The samples will be analyzed for stable water isotopes and impurity potentially allowing developing detection and correction methods for changes in seasonal accumulation.
Operating Period: From: November To: December

Name: Activities at Kohnen Station: SNOB
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Kohnen Station   Lat: 75º 00´ 00´´ S   Long: 00º 04´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population: 20
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer Station
Remarks / Description: PI: J. Freitag (AWI) In areas of low annual snow accumulation the seasonal distribution in accumulation, the amount of redistribution and metamorphism of snow are important controls for a reliable interpretation of ice core records on centennial and decadal time scales. This project initiates a framework for long-term snowpack observations in a low accumulation area around Kohnen station. It addresses the temporal evolution of the snow pack which includes observations of surface relief, seasonal accumulation, snow structure properties, chemical load and isotopic composition. To this end designated areas will be assigned for repeated sampling of snow pack over the next years to follow its development with time.
Operating Period: From: November To: February
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station and remote seismographic stations: Geophysics Observatory
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: T. Fromm (AWI) a) Seismology The primary objective of the seismographic observations at Neumayer-III (NM) is to complement the worldwide network of seismographic monitoring stations in the southern hemisphere. Special interests focus on the detection of local and regional earthquakes within Antarctica. Long term monitoring of regional seismicity over many years may eventually allow a rather detailed mapping of seismic active regions within the Antarctic plate. This will contribute to a better understanding of current neotectonic processes in Antarctica. The local seismographic network at Neumayer-III Station comprises the Geophysics Observatory VNA1 near NM itself and 2 remote stations VNA2 and VNA3 on the ice rises Halvfar Ryggen and Søråsen, resp. Additionally to seismic broadband recording a small aperture detection array with 15 vertical seismometers placed on three concentric rings with a total diameter of almost 2 km is operated at station VNA2. This array is a powerful tool for monitoring local and regional seismicity. Other unattended seismographic broadband stations are operated at the Russion base Novolazarevskaya, at Kohnen Station, near Weigel Nunatak and at the Swedish summer base Svea. The seismic broadband station at Sanae IV is also included into the larger seismographic network. Additional recordings from seismic stations in and around Antarctica are retrieved via internet and are very helpful for reliable localizations of Antarctic earthquakes. As in previous years both remote stations VNA2 and VNA3 have to be serviced during austral season 2018/2019 by members of the wintering team and a summer staff. Servicing the station at Weigel Nunatak will be carried out during the Kohnen/DROMseis traverse. The station at Kohnen will either be serviced by a Kohnen traverse member or during a short day trip together with the retrieval of air freight. Data retrieval at the Novolazarevskaya seismic station will be made by a summer staff member when arriving in Antarctica from Cape Town. The Svea and Utpostane station will be serviced with a Twin Otter from Wasa/Aboa. b) Geomagnetism The new Geomagnetic Observatory at Neumayer-III was built during January and February 2009 and the routine observations were carried on at the new site with just a rather short data gap. During summer season 2011/2012 a second 3-component fluxgate magnetometer was installed. It is a standard FGE fluxgate sensor which is the current worldwide observatory standard. This second sensor was placed on top of a deeply frozen in, stable pillar outside the measuring hut. The geomagnetic observatory comprises now a NS orientated STL 3-component sensor and a second FGE sensor oriented in magnetic North direction. A GSM-19 Overhauser proton-magnetometer is used for recording total intensity. All systems run at a sample rate of 1 second. For better absolute measurements of the field components also a second declinometer was installed on a stable pillar outside the measuring container housing. Continuous recording of the second system started in July 2013, however, still interrupted by some software problems. Since January 2014 we have been operating with no major interruptions anymore and in July we became am member of the Intermagnet organsiation. During summer season2017/18 a high frequency magnetometer was installed and will be serived this year. c) GPS recordings Contiunuous GPS recordings were carried on again and are now available sind beginning of July 2012. This is accomplished using a 2-band Ashtec Z-12 receiver with its antenna on the roof of Neumayer-III. Converted data in Rinex format are available on request and might in future be downloaded from a web interface. These GPS recordings have been relaunched because they provide valuable informations for higher atmosphere reasearch. 4) Areas of activity Neumayer-III Station and vicinity, Weigel Nunatak, Svea, Utpostane, Kohnen.
Operating Period: From: December To: February
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: Balloon trench
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: P. Koehler (AWI) In a snow pit (L / W / T = 34x9x8m plus ramp) made with the snow groomer, a balloon body of dimensions 30 x 5m filled with overpressure is placed. The pit is filled with milled snow around the balloon. After the milled snow has built new bridges to get chained and formed a supporting unit, the now deflated balloon will be removed. In the firn ice a 30 x 5m large cavity remains. By means of a second upright balloon of 8 x 2m, an access shaft is made analogously. A lid component closes the access hole for blowing snow. The snow cave is being built as a test structure for the new Magnetic Observatory. After completion, a 30 x 5m large void space remains in the firn. In view of the increasing snow load on the vaulted ceiling of the cavity, the dimensional stability of the walls should be determined. For this purpose, the cavity is regularly measured contactless by using a laser scanner. If the dimensional stability of the structure is given, and even with larger snow covers the room height does not decrease, a construction method is available for example, to accommodate the new Magnetic Observatory. The advantage is that after the end of its use of the cavity no building material remains in the firn.
Operating Period: From: January To: February
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: Maintenance Airchemistry observatory Neumayer
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: R. Weller (AWI) During the forthcoming summer campaign, the installation of special scientific equipment concerning the project NPFAnt (Molecular steps of new particle formation at Antarctic coast) of the University of Helsinki and the Finish Meteorological Institute (FMI) will start early in November/December. This Finnish project is in cooperation with the AWI. We plan to begin with the actual research program mid of December and to terminate the NPFAnt campaign in late February 2019. Thereafter we will send back the whole equipment to Finland. Furthermore the Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (LP-DOAS) from the IUP Heidelberg (PI: Jan-Marcus Nasse and Udo Frieß), installed in austral summer 2015/16, will also be dismantled at the end of the summer campaign. We will try to maximize the overlap of the LP-DOAS measurements with the contemporaneous Finnish field campaign. The main objective of the LP-DOAS experiment is to measure bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) within the atmospheric boundary layer, which is a valuable complement to the Finnish measuring program. Finally, there will be the usual routine work, maintenance, and calibration operations at the Air Chemistry Observatory as well as training of the new air chemistry over-winterer Dr. Marcus Schumacher.
Operating Period: From: December To: February

Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: MARE
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: D. Zitterbart (WHO) and C. LeBohec (CSM & CNRS-UniStra) The main goal of MARE project is to assess the vulnerability of Antarctic ecosystems using a sentinel species of Polar Regions: the Emperor penguin. Up to now, the general biology of the entire species (all the breeding, life-history, demographic parameters) was based on the monitoring of a single colony (Pointe Géologie, Adélie Land). Yet, to evaluate the overall trend of a species and the amplitude of its adaptive capacities, it is crucial to monitor over the long-term more than one population breeding in different ecosystems, considering in addition that the species is at a high risk of extinction in a very near future according to climatic scenarios. We thus aim to set up a second worldwide Life Observatory of emperor penguins (Atka Bay, Queen Maud Land) to predict how this species will adapt to climate changes and the consequent fluctuations prey availability and abundance. As umbrella species, seabirds can play an important role in determining the size for conservation areas, and gathering knowledge on the distribution at sea of the species will help to define and map marine biological hotspots/Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Knowledge of the distribution at sea and of foraging strategies of emperor penguins is extremely scarce. We aim to fill this gap through the equipment of individuals from Atka Bay colony with data-loggers at different stages of their life cycle. Scientific Objectives for the Season 2018/2019 1) Pursue the second worldwide Life Observatory of emperor penguins. 1a) Long-term electronic monitoring of emperor penguins breeding in Atka Bay to study the capacity of the species to adapt and cope with human-induced changes. Following the same methodology used in Pointe Géologie since 2009 and in Atka Bay since last season 2017-2018, each year and over several decades, 300 five-month-old emperor penguin chicks (i.e. chicks starting their moult and ready to fledge in December 2018/January 2019) from the colony of Akta Bay will be implanted subcutaneously between the leg and the tail with small Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags (0.8 g, 32 mm X 2.85 mm) in order to monitor birds of known-age and -history throughout their life. Tagging 300 chicks ensures that there are still approx. 20 individuals living in 20 years. Classical samples (10 feathers and < 2 ml of blood; for sexing, stable isotope and contaminant analyses) and measurements (weight, beak and flippers' length) will be performed during the manipulation that lasts < 7 min per chick. PIT-tagged individuals will be detected and identified with a Mobile Identification System, first by mobile antennas, temporary deployable on access passageways to birds’ breeding sites (already developed by the CNRS of Strasbourg and used in Adélie Land), or mounted on remote-operated rovers (pending for funding from DFG). Temporary deployments of the mobile antennas at key access passage-ways shall be conducted by the overwinterers between April and December 2019. 1b) Phenology, census and major constraints in emperor penguin colonies. In order to set up a long-term study, the monitoring of fundamental variables of the colony all over the year and over years is primordial to assess the risk of extinction of this population. Hence, observations will be carried out in the emperor penguin colony throughout the whole breeding season by monitoring the annual breeding cycle through direct observations and pictures/videos of the whole colony using SPOT Observatory: phenology and important dates (such as arrival/breeding date, laying/hatching date, fledging date); population size and proportion of individuals in a specific status; annual breeding success and egg/chick mortalities (through collect and direct census); occupancy (surface) and location/movement of the colony; birds’ movements between the breeding colony and the sea; etc. 2) Gather knowledge on habitat used at sea by emperor penguins to be able to define and map marine biological ‘hotspots’ and/or Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). 2a) Basic information of distribution at sea of emperor penguins from Atka colony. As last season 2017/2018, our aim is to equip i) 20 adults (10 males and 10 females) with miniaturized GPS-TDR loggers from November to December 2018 to obtain information regarding their foraging grounds during the summer, and ii) 8 moulting adults (4 males and 4 females if possible) with miniaturized Argos-TDR loggers from December 2018 to January 2019 to obtain information regarding their foraging grounds during the winter (depending on the device: between 45 and 80 g; 79*38*18 mm and 107*18*21 mm). These birds will also be PIT-tagged, marked with hair dye, measured, weighed, and sampled (10 feathers and < 2 ml of blood). The manipulation lasts 30-40 min per individual. The hair dye mark will be used to locate them when they return to their breeding sites, so they can be desequipped, weighed, blood sampled, and finally observed. 2b) How age impact the foraging efficiency of emperor penguins. Management of stored reserves in individuals at different life stages is linked to individual foraging abilities (prospection of good foraging grounds and diving/catching efficiency), which are age/experience- and quality-dependent. Moreover, juveniles and prime age adults might be more sensitive to climatic variation than older breeding adults. Our aim was thus to use location systems to monitor activities at sea of juveniles, and thus to equip with Argos-TDR 10 to 15 chicks ready to fledge and, if possible, for which one of the parent has been equipped the whole year. Unfortunately, due to the lack of funding, we will not be able to achieve this goal this upcoming season. However, if the availability of moulting adults (Objective 2aii) is not sufficient, some of the 8 miniaturized Argos-TDR loggers may be deployed on chicks.
Operating Period: From: November To: January
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: MARGEO
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Atka Bay, close to Neumayer Station III   Lat:    Long:   
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: O. Eisen (AWI) This project aims to collect gastroliths from Emperor Penguins of the Atka Bay colony in order to 1) obtain geologic samples from the seafloor in the vicinity of the colony; 2) determine the geologic provenance and composition of gastroliths and other stomach contents to determine foraging range of Atka Bay Empreror Penguins; 3) perform a pilot study to consider collection of gastroliths on a continuous basis. The gatroliths will be collected by i) guano sampling at MARE team's location of operation (tens of meters in order to minimize disturbance of the colony) and also at other places, wherever it is found, e.g. also on the Ekströmisen or sea ice in the Atka Bay; ii) as an additional sampling strategy, it is considered to take stomach samples from dead penguin chicks and investigate them for gastroliths. This will be done on site and the dead chicks will be left behind. When sampling the stomach content, the MARE team also considers to collect other contents of the stomach, such as squid beaks, to further constrain foraging and diet characteristics as part of the MARE project.
Operating Period: From: November To: January
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: Yearly maintenance meteorological observatory Neumayer
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: H. Schmithüsen (AWI) The meteorological observatory programme at Neumayer-Station is ongoing. It includes: • 3-hourly synoptic observations • daily upper-air soundings • weekly ozone soundings • continuous surface radiation and mast measurements • satellite picture reception (HRPT) • training of the over winterer staff • preparation of the over wintering period 2018 During the summer season 2015/16 an automatic weather station (AWS) was installed around 90 km south-west of the Neumayer Station on Søråsen. The operation of the station continues. On-site inspection and maintenance is planned for the summer season 2018/19. From 2018-11-16 till 2019-02-15 the international coordinated project “Year Of Polar Prediction” (YOPP) plans a so-called “Special Observing Period” (SOP). During the SOP the radiosoundings at Neumayer-Station will be increased to 4 sondes per day. In 2018/19 the Meteorological Observatory Neumayer will be extended by a single column precipitation radar (Micro Rain Radar “MRR-Pro”, Fa. Metek, Germany). The instrument will be installed on the roof of the main building of the Neumayer-Station. Within the DROMLAN, the meteorological observatory of the Neumayer-Station offers detailed and individual weather forecast services for all activities in Dronning Maud Land, especially all aircraft operations. This service is delivered in close cooperation between the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and the German Weather Service (DWD). This service increases the safety of the field projects in the Dronning Maud Land and it helps to reduce weather induced idle times of expensive flight operations to a minimum. The service will start again in November 2018.
Operating Period: From: December To: February
Name: Activities at Neumayer Station: Yearly maintenance of the CTBTO I27DE Array
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: M. Hoffmann (BGR) According to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the IS27 infrasound station is operated at the German “Neumayer” Antarctic Research base as one of 60 elements of the infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS). Infrasound stations measure micropressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. Therefore they are mainly focussed on the monitoring of the compliance of the CTBT with respect to atmospheric nuclear explosions. The approximately uniform global distribution of the 60 stations ensures the ability to detect any atmospheric nuclear explosion of 1 kiloton TNT equivalent or more by at least two stations. Besides IS27, three other infrasound stations will be established along the coast of Antarctica. The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) operates the German National Data Center (NDC) for the CTBT and is responsible for the operation of IS27, which will be carried out in close co-operation with the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI). IS27 is an infrasound array with nine array stations. Each station is equipped with a microbarometer and a data acquisition system. Meteorological sensors are installed at the central station. A wind-noise reducing pipe array is connected to each microbarometer. The distribution of the inlet ports to the microbarometer in a wide area ensures the suppression of the influence of wind-generated disturbances. The central array control system is installed in the seismo-acoustic observatory to power the stations and retrieve the recorded data. The infrasound data are transmitted continuously in near real time with a maximum delay of 5 minutes to the International Data Center (IDC) in Vienna, Austria, sharing the permanent satellite link between the Neumayer base and AWI. IS27 is to be operated continuously with at least 98 % data availability over a year's time, which is required for an IMS station. Routine maintenance of the array is a prerequisite to ensure the high reliability and is normally carried out every year during the Austral summer between December and February. During this period, the nine array elements have to be recovered from the snow and re-installed on the surface. The condition of the equipment has to be checked and software upgrades have to be installed.
Operating Period: From: January To: February

Name: Activities at Neumayer: EDEN-ISS
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: D. Schubert (DLR) The EDEN ISS project was funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 project (reference number: 636501) supported via the COMPET-07-2014 - Space exploration – Life support subprogramme. The project has developed and has subsequently deployed an advanced plant production system to the Neumayer III Antarctic station in the summer season 2017/18. The EDEN ISS greenhouse container was operated for a full winter season at the analogue test site in Antarctica (Neumayer Station III). The production of fresh food for the overwintering crew was successful and more than 140 kg of lettuce, cucumber, radish, tomatoes, and herbs have been harvested until end of the winter season. Scientific investigations on microbial behavior within the grow chamber, biomass quality examinations, and operation procedure testing were also performed. In the season 2018/19 several systems in the container will be upgraded and repaired. The greenhouse will be operated by the overwintering team of the NM-III and supported by the EDEN team in the mission control room at DLR Bremen. In addition to the production of fresh food for the crew on site several scientific questions regarding remote operations of a greenhouse in extreme environments will be investigated.
Operating Period: From: January To: February
Name: Activities near Neumayer Station: Sub-EIS-Obs - geological short corings
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Ekström Ice Shelf   Lat: 70º 38´ 11´´ S   Long: 08º 11´ 42´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: F. Wilhelms (AWI) This project plans a geological pre-site survey with the goal to assess the potential of the sed-imentary archive below the Ekström Ice Shelf for reconstructing East-Antarctic paleoclimate and ice history (from warm Greenhouse climates to the latest Ice House era). In the vicinity of Neumayer-Station, recent geophysical surveys identified a succession of sediments below the Ekström Ice Shelf (Kristoffersen et al. 2014; Smith et al. 2017). These sediments overly the “Explora Wedge” outcrop, which is believed to reflect volcanic rocks of an early rift margin separating South Africa from East Antarctica. Accordingly, the sediments may contain a rec-ord of Cretaceous-Cenozoic climate, glaciation and tectonics. However, the stratigraphic range of the sediment sequence is unknown and up to now remained speculative. Due to the combination of inclined bedding and glacial erosion, sediments of a wide age range reach close to the sea bed. In those areas, where the the dipping strata is only covered by a hori-zontal, thin, glacial-deglacial layer (< 5 m thickness), the older sediment layers are accessible through shallow drilling. Hence, our primary target is to deploy a sediment coring system, which is able to penetrate the thin uppermost layer and thus will allow for sampling of the old-er, dipping sediment sequences in order to identify their age range and quality. Our geological pre-site survey is embedded in a chain of seismic and geological surveys that started during the last Antarctic summer season in 2015/2016. The overarching goal repre-sents a joint effort between the AWI and the BGR (Sub-EIS-Obs) for selecting several sites with the potential of deep drillings (several hundreds meter deep) and deciphering the history of East-Antarctic climate, glaciation and tectonic change (Kuhn & Gaedicke, 2015). At best, the deep drillings may recover hard rocks from the Explora Escarpment as well as Creta-ceous-Cenozoic sediment sequences. Our pre-site survey will be conducted to identify bore-hole locations that best achieve the requirements of the following overarching research goals and questions: • Does the Explora Wedge really represent the initial rifting zone between Antarctica and Afri-ca? How old are the rock sequences? • Understanding Antarctica’s climate evolution from Paleocene greenhouse warmth into the Ice House world (last 55 Ma), including cyclicity, temperatures, vegetation and assessing the pole-equator temperature gradients. • Reconstructing Ekström Ice Shelf/East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics and sensitivities for dif-ferent time intervalls, when it was on average 2 to 6°C warmer than today. • Understanding the system of processes and interactions between Ekström Ice Shelf dynam-ics – coastal current variability – Weddell Sea Gyre response and its control on the formation and the distribution of AABW in the Atlantic (provides a strong climate feedback through changes in AABW heat, salt and nutrient transport influencing deep ocean circulation and chemistry as well as biological productivity in upwelling regions) The goals of our planned pre-site survey represent milestones that have to be addressed in order to reach a decision about the pro and cons of future deep drillings into the “Neumayer Cenozoic Sediment Basin” below the Ekström Ice Shelf: • Testing the two shallow coring technologies (Vibrocoring and UWITEC systems) and im-proving them for possible, additional pre-site surveys in 2018/2019. • Sampling the youngest and oldest dipping sedimentary sequences to build a stratigraphic framework for deeper drilling. • Investigating the uppermost sediment layer (topset bed). It may provide hints about most re-cent Holocene Ekström Ice Shelf retreats, reflecting open water conditions instead of subgla-cial environments. As the Explora Wedge outcrops about 10 km south of Neumayer Station and the overlying sediment sequence inclines to the north, the sediment layers became younger to the north. The horizontal glacial-deglacial topset bed is thinnest (< 5 m) 5 to 20 km north of Neumayer Station. This defines our target area for coring. Within this area, we plan two coring sites with maximum distance to each other. This strategy will allow to capture the top and base of the largest time span possible that can be recovered within the target region. A detailed map of the target region (< 5 m topset bed) will be provided by July 2017 through an improved seis-mic processing (pers. comm. Prof. Dr. O. Eisen). However, before defining the final position of the coring sites, we would like to consider the results of an immediately preceeding seismic sur-vey campaign (2017/2018; pre-decided with Prof. Dr. O. Eisen), which will provide excep-tion-al, very high resolution data. The seismic technology used will be capable of revealing areas that are marked by a topset bed thinner than 2 m. The detection of such areas will sig-nificantly increase our chance to recover sediments from the older layers underneath. We will use a Hot Water Drilling (HWD) technology to drill through the floating ice shelve and to gain access to the sediments at the sea floor (responsibility Prof. Frank Wilhelms). The ice thickness is about 250 – 300 m, the thickness of the water column is about 400 – 500 m. A 30 cm diameter access hole through the ice enables the operation of different sediment coring systems: a vibrocorer technology tested by our chinese collegues (Gong et al., 2016) and the UWITEC system, which was already successfully used below Pine Island, Filchner, and Larsen Ice Shelf (Smith et al. 2017). In addition, it is planned to carry out precision measurements of the shelf ice movement in the surrounding of Neumayer-Station by installing radar reflectors in one of the drill holes, which then can be tracked by ground-based ApRes radar measuresments.
Operating Period: From: November To: January
Name: Activities near Neumayer: Sub-EIS-Obs geological corings
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Neumayer III   Lat: 70º 41´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 18´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 50
Medical Facilities: hospital
Remarks / Description: PI: F. Wilhelms (AWI) Nine sites from different target categories, like e.g. Explora Wedge, Marine Sediments, Disturbed Marine Sediments and Shelf front sediments have been identified and prioritised for geological sampling of the seafloor below the Ekström shelf ice cavern. Through the projected hot water drill holes the acquisition of sediment samples by means of sediment grabber, percussion corer and vibrocorer is envisaged. At some sites CTD profiles and initial phase-senstive radar measurements will be carried out.
Operating Period: From: November To: January
Name: Antarctic Mumiyo_1
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica   Lat:    Long:   
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: S. Berg (Uni Cologne) We intent to sample mumiyo deposits from different areas in western Dronning Maud Land in order to map the temporal and spatial distribution of snow petrel colonies at inland sites to i) better constrain glaciation histories of the nunataks in western Dronning Maud, to ii) identify changes in the local environmental and oceanic conditions since and within the last glacial (with focus on the region as a glacial refuge for Antarctic biota) and to iii) look for traces of human induced pollution on the Antarctic continent. The work programme includes prospecting for potential sampling sites and sampling of mumiyo deposits from ice-free sites in western Dronning Maud Land, including the Utpostale area in the Vestfjella and the Scharffenbergbotnen and Milorgfjella in the Heimefrontfjella. The sampling will be closely linked to the work of Tanja Fromm (AWI) who visits seismic stations in all three areas and will conduct the sampling. The duration of the project is from December 2018 to February 2019.
Operating Period: From: December To: February

Name: Dallmann Laboratory at Base Carlini
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Dallmann Laboratory   Lat: 62º 14´ 00´´ S   Long: 58º 14´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population: 16
Medical Facilities: hospital at Carlini Base
Remarks / Description: PI: D. Mengedoht (AWI) The Dallmann Laboratory is located at the Argentinean Base Carlini on King George Island. It was established as an international laboratory funded by the Instituto Antartico Argentino (IAA) and AWI in 1994. Access to and supply of the Dallmann Laboratory is coordinated in co-operation between AWI and DNA/IAA. On site support is provided by the technical staff of Carlini station. Research focussed on: marine and terrestrial biological studies, solar UV, ecophysical investigations, geological field works.
Operating Period: From: November To: March
Name: GANOVEX XIII
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Gondwana Station    Lat: 74º 38´ 00´´ S   Long: 164º 13´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities:
Remarks / Description: PI: A. Laeufer (BGR) GANOVEX XIII involves the participation of a multinational and interdisciplinary team with scientists and technicians from Germany, Italy, Sweden, New Zealand, and Australia. The main research topics are: (i) The Ross Orogeny and geodynamic evolution of East Gondwana’s Palaeopacific margin in the late Ediacaran-early Paleozoic; (ii) Gondwana between amalgamation and break-up (the Middle/Late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic time window); (iii) the modern continent - structure and shaping of Antarctica during Gondwana break-up since the middle-late Mesozoic. Within the frame of GANOVEX XIII, several research projects are planned to be carried out. The individual projects cover different geoscientific disciplines involving structural geology, geo- and thermochronology, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) studies, geochemistry, petrology, palaeontology, and aerogeophysics. The expedition supports also an astrobiological-geomorphological project that investigates Antarctica as a natural laboratory for planetary-analogue geomicrobiological studies with Mars and Europa. Individual projects are: -Aerogeophysical high-resolution survey over the Mariner Suture Zone and Polar-3-Anomaly: implications for Ross- and post-Ross geodynamics (PI: A. Ruppel, BGR) -Possible continuity of Proterozoic Selwyn block rocks of southeastern Australia into Victoria Land and East Antarctic island arc terranes and their tectonic significance (PI: S. Boger, Uni. Mainz) -Indirect tectonics and provenance analysis of (meta-)sedimentary units of NVL terranes: implications for Paleo-Pacific active continental margin evolution of Gondwana (PI: A. Läufer; BGR) -Meso-Cenozoic geodynamics in NVL and its implications for the opening of the Tasman Gateway, development of the passive margin, and the West Antarctic Rift System (PI: A. Läufer, BGR) -Exhumation and uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains: key parameters of the tectonics/climate feedbacks based on variation in denudation/uplift and sedimentation rates (PI: F. Lisker, Uni. Bremen; A. Läufer, BGR) -Fault rocks and syntectonic alterations in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) in the light of polyphase tectonics: combined microstructural and mineralogic investigations (PI: L. Crispini, Uni Genova; A. Läufer, BGR) -The Beacon Supergroup with special emphasis on sedimentology, fossil floras and vertebrate paleontology (PI: B. Bomfleur, Uni. Münster; T. Mörs, Swedish Mus. Natural History Stockholm) -Geological Mapping of the Convey Range (PI: G. Capponi, Univ. Genova) -Antarctica: analoges for the search for life on Mars (PI: J.-P. de Vera, DLR Berlin) -Gullies and water tracks in continental Antarctica: analogs for Mars (PI: E. Hauber, DLR Berlin) The expedition will be carried out in two legs. The dates are approximately: Opening of Gondwana Station - 26 Oct 2018 Leg 1 - 26 Oct to 20 Nov 2018 – Aerogeophysics and Planetary Geology Science Program Leg 2 - 15 Nov 2018 to 22 Jan 2019 – Geology Science Program Closing of Gondwana Station – 27 Jan 2019 The inbound journey to Terra Nova Bay will be via intercontinental flight either from Hobart (A319, AAD) or from Christchurch (C-130, N.Z.D.F.). Transit from Hobart to Terra Nova Bay (A319) A319/1 – 5 persons – ETD 26 Oct 2018 A319/2 - 4 persons – ETD 30 Oct 2018 A319/3 – 3 persons - ETD 02 Nov 2018 Transit from Christchurch to Terra Nova Bay (C-130) C-130/1 – 4 persons – ETD 15 Nov 2018 C-130/2 – 5 persons – ETD 20 Nov 2018 The outbound journey will be via intercontinental flight or via ship: Transit from Terra Nova Bay to Hobart (A319) A-319/1 – 1 person – ETD 06 Nov 2018 Transit Terra Nova Bay to Christchurch (C-130) C-130/1 – 2 persons – 15 Nov 2018 C-130/2 – 2 persons – 20 Nov 2018 Transit Terra Nova Bay to Lyttelton „Happy D“ support vessel – 12 persons – ETD 22 Jan 2019, ETA LYT 29 Jan 2019 Xue Long – 5 persons - ETD 28 Jan 2019, ETA LYT 03 Feb 2019 Station visits of Jang Bogo Station (KOR) and Mario Zucchelli Station (ITA) are planned.
Operating Period: From: October To: January
Name: Gondwana-Station
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Gondwana Station    Lat: 74º 38´ 00´´ S   Long: 164º 13´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities:
Remarks / Description: PI: C. Kasch (BGR) The German Gondwana Station is a non-permanent facility at Gerlache Inlet of Terra Nova Bay on the Ross Sea, operated by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). It was erected during the GANOVEX III expedition in 1982/1983 as a bivouac hut and then extended and converted into a summer station during GANOVEX V (1988/1989). Gondwana Station is accessible by ship or an aeroplane capable of landing on the sea ice in Terra Nova Bay. Gondwana Station was used as the main base during numerous BGR expeditions to northern Victoria Land. After more than 30 years of its existence, major renovation and modernization of the station was carried out in several seasons. During season 2017/18, the modernization was completed and was made ready for its next scientific season 2018-19. The systems were put in operation and where necessary optimized. The amount of Jet A1 for the generators was with 2.5 drums for the whole season much lower than the usual 1.25 drums per day before renovation, which was also due to the additional use of solar panels. Transport of building material, construction equipment and personnel was facilitated with the logistical support of the Italian National Antarctic Research Programme.
Operating Period: From: October To: January
Name: Kohnen Station
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Kohnen Station   Lat: 75º 00´ 00´´ S   Long: 00º 04´ 00´´ E  
Maximum Population: 20
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: C. Wesche (AWI) The station is currently used as the logistic base for subglacial studies using the EPICA drilling hole as well as for meteorological, air chemistry and seismic observations and glaciological field investigations. The station will also provide ground service for scientific aircraft mission above the inland ice plateau. The station is located on the inland ice plateau (Amundsenisen, Wegnerisen). The distance along the sledge traverse route to Neumayer Station III is about 750 km. Access to the station is possible by means of sledge traverses starting from NEUMAYER STATION III at the cost or by aircraft support in the frame of Dronning Maud Land Air Network (DROMLAN). The air link is mainly used for the transport of personnel, light weighted scientific cargo and food. The advantage of this aircraft access is that it became possible to start scientific works early in the season or to carry out a short stay for maintenance and service automatic stations. Supply of the station is mainly based on sledge traverses to transport large amount of fuel, consumables and material. To travel from NEUMAYER STATION III to KOHNEN STATION takes 11 days on average. The typical arrangement of a sledge train is 6 towing vehicles (Pistenbulli), 12 sledges carrying piece goods and containers, and 5 sledges with tank containers and accommodation facilities. On average about 180 tons of supply goods are needed to run the station. The fuel consumption is about 400 litres per one ton of payload over a distance of 1,000 km. Projects includen: Kottaspegel (PI: O. Eisen, AWI)
Operating Period: From: November To: February

Name: MT_ANT2
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Ekström Ice Shelf, Neumayer Station II   Lat: 70º 39´ 00´´ S   Long: 08º 15´ 00´´ W  
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: O. Ritter (GFZ) The objectives of our proposal are twofold. On a longer term perspective we would like to develop magnetotellurics (MT) as an additional geophysical deep sounding tool that can help decipher the deep hydrology and geology of Antarctica, in concert with more established and already applied geophysical methods, such as seismics, gravity, and magnetics. Electrical conductivity is an important physical parameter to identify properties of rocks and, perhaps more importantly, constituents within, such as fluids or ore mineralisation. The electrical conductivity of fluids depends strongly on their salinity and temperature: Seawater is highly conductive (~0.3 m), while snow and ice are typically very resistive materials; their resistivity can easily exceed 100,000 m. The transition from an ice-layer (e.g. the Ekström Ice Shelf) into the underlying ocean water, represents a first order anomaly that can be imaged with MT. The second and undeniably more pressing objective in the short term is on overcoming technical issues with respect to the used equipment from the Geophysical Instrument Pool Potsdam. Our proposal is a follow-on of pioneering work close to Neumayer station in Antarctica which suggested general feasibility of the method but also problems particularly with the electric field recordings. The highly resistive snow at surface of Antarctica hampers contact to the E-field sensors (telluric electrodes). To overcome these principal problems we have modified our existing equipment and sensors (new ultra-high impedance input amplifiers, non-freezing electrodes, thermally insulated equipment enclosures).
Operating Period: From: January To: February
Name: Sound environment of Pygoscelis penguins
Type: Summer
Location:
Site Name: Antarctic Peninsula; King George Island   Lat:    Long:   
Maximum Population:
Medical Facilities: no medical facilities
Remarks / Description: PI: M. Beaulieu (Deutsches Meeresmuseum) The Ocean and the Antarctic are both typically considered as the realms of silence on Earth. However, this silence is currently being disrupted, as human activities are increasing in both environments 1,2. Marine and Antarctic animals have evolved over millions of years under such silent conditions, and their resulting adaptations are therefore currently challenged. However, whether and how these novel noise sources affect marine and Antarctic animals remains to be determined. To understand the response of animal species to novel noise conditions, two crucial steps are needed: (1) describing the variety of noise conditions experienced by animals (naturally produced or not; Aim 1), and (2) defining their hearing capacity (Aim 2) 3. Such an approach is in line with the six priorities recently defined for Antarctic research 4,5. In this context, the German Oceanographic Museum in Stralsund (Germany) has recently launched a new research program on the hearing capacity of penguins (https://www.deutsches-meeresmuseum.de/en/science-research/projects/currentprojects/ hearing-in-penguins/) in cooperation with Odensee Zoo (Denmark), the University of Rostock (Germany) and the Natural History Museum in Berlin (Germany), and funded by the German Environment Agency. The aim of this project is to examine the hearing capacity of several penguin species using bio-acoustic methods in birds maintained in captivity (Gentoo, rockhoppper, king and Humboldt penguins; 2019-2021; Ozeaneum in Stralsund, Odensee Zoo) and studied in the wild (Adélie penguins; 2019-2020; Dumont d’Urville, Adélie Land; in collaboration with the French Polar Institute Paul Emile Victor). Even though penguins are expected to be adapted to silent conditions underwater, they may also experience very loud conditions when breeding in dense colonies. Despite this ambient loudness, penguins are still able to recognize relatives based on the acoustic properties of their calls 6,7, thereby showing their refined ability to differentiate intraspecific calls. The ability of penguins to perceive other terrestrial sounds remains, however, unknown. During the next Quixote Expedition onboard the sailing boat “Ocean Tramp” along the Antarctic Peninsula, we want to make an inventory of the sound environment of Pygoscelis penguins by describing the variety of sounds they can experience in their natural habitat (Aim 1). Towards this end, two different types of measurements will be conducted for each penguin colony we will be able to approach: on land and underwater sound measurements. Ambient noise (i.e. background acoustic noise without distinguishable sources 8) will be measured both on land and underwater, while colony sounds and penguin vocalizations will be measured on land. For on land measurements, ambient sound volumes will be measured with a portable omnidirectional microphone. We will try to collect the whole range of ambient sound volumes experienced by penguins (produced naturally or not) by recording sounds from very silent places (no penguins, no human activities) to very noisy environments (center of a penguin colony, research station). Sound recording will last three minutes, and climatic conditions will be measured with a portable weather station at the same time. Measurements should not generate disturbance for penguins, except when they are conducted directly within colonies. In that case, we will quietly walk along areas with low nest density to reach areas where nest density is maximal (and presumably also sound volumes). Once in these areas, we will squat down and start recording for three minutes. While in the colony, we will also try to target nest relief ceremonies between partners of the same nest, as these ceremonies are particularly loud 9. In that case, we will use a unidirectional microphone for less than a minute directed towards the nest of interest, but the distance between the nest and the microphone will remain > 2 meters. We will then quietly leave the colony and reach an area with no penguin nests, and measure sound volumes outside the colony in order to record baseline sound volumes. The whole operation within the colony (walking into the colony, recording, leaving the colony) should not last longer than 15-20 minutes. Moreover, in order to minimize disturbance, only two persons (Michaël Beaulieu and a passenger from the boat) will enter the colony together to conduct measurements. Michaël Beaulieu has ample previous experience with Pygoscelis penguins (four summer campaigns spent working in colonies of Adélie penguins in Adélie Land), and will train passengers willing to take part in sound measurements within colonies beforehand. Such an approach will fit particularly well with the philosophy of Quixote Expeditions, which main aim is to educate a small number of passengers to the Antarctic environment and to the research conducted in the Antarctic. The aim of the training provided to passengers before entering colonies will be to learn how to behave in penguin colonies (in order to minimize direct human disturbance) and how to conduct measurements (in order to conduct measurements within colonies as quickly as possible). For underwater measurements, ambient sound volumes will be measured using an omnidirectional hydrophone deployed from a rubber boat with a cable while leaving penguin colonies. Measurements will be conducted from the coast near the colony to a distance of 200 meters at a constant depth of three meters (i.e. within the depth range (0-15 m) in which penguins transit when leaving the colony 10). At the end of this transect, sound volumes will be measured across the water column. Importantly, sound volumes will also be measured away from penguin colonies in any situation that might affect sound environment and that penguins may encounter (e.g. storm, proximity of motorized vessels or research stations). All passengers will be able to take part in these measurements. The fact that Quixote Expeditions organizes expeditions aboard a sailing boat with only few passengers provides us with a great opportunity to conduct high-quality measurements of ambient noise without excessive parasitic noise and to minimize disturbance when approaching colonies. The sounds collected during this expedition will subsequently serve as a reference for the bio-acoustic measurements conducted in Europe and in Dumont d’Urville, as they will allow us to know the ecological relevance of the sound volumes to which birds are sensitive during bio-acoustic experiments (Aim 2).
Operating Period: From: December To: December
Name: Kottasdichte
Type: Field Camp
Location:
Site Name: Kottasberge   Lat: 74°20´S   Long: 9°45´W  
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: O. Eisen (AWI) Specific surface mass balance is one of the most important parameters to determine the current overall mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet. At the same time it is also one of the inaccurately know quantities. Although remote sensing methods have been developed to track surface accumulation over time and interpolate in space, reliable estimates still crucially depend on measurements of surface accumulation on site. To track the development of surface mass balance in a changing climate, it is not only important to cover white spots, but also obtain continuous records of snow accumulation at selected sites. Only long time series, which cover larger distances, allow to reliably charaterise the statistical properties of snow surface accumulation, i.e. the changes from year to year and changes in space. Only few of such records exist to date, mostly along regulary visited traverse routes between permanent stations and summer field camps or stations. This expedition re-initiates the continuous measurements of annual surface snow mass balance along a stake line from Neumayer III via Kottas to Kohnen station. These are observed as part of the project “Kottaspegel”. In order to reliably convert the change in surface elevation from accumulation and ablation to mass, the density is required. In addition to the stake readings the upcoming traverse will also be used to determine density in the upper meter of the snow surface from snow pit and liner measurements.
Name: ThermoAnt
Type: Field Camp
Location:
Site Name: Forstefjellsrabben   Lat: 71º 50´ 22´´ S   Long: 5º 43´ 43´´ W  
Medical Facilities: hospital at Neumayer
Remarks / Description: PI: O. Eisen (AWI) Thermo- and geo-chronologic data are essential for determining the rate and timescale of geologic processes. In the context of glacial settings, these data have proven invaluable for quantifying (1) the timing of ice retreat from a region and the exposure of rocks to cosmic rays, and (2) rates of glacial erosion and sediment production which are critical for understanding the availability of subglacial sediment used to understand ice sheet dynamics. In this sample collection campaign a suite of ~10 samples will be collected from two nunataks Førstefjellsrabben and Førstefjell (roughly at position 71.8°S, 7°W) in the vicinity of the Ekströmisen drainage basin in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Emphasis will be placed on sampling the range of lithologies exposed at each outcrop to identify which units hold promise for future, more detailed, sampling. The samples are intended as a reconnaissance survey of the region and will provide information on if the mineralogical composition of the rocks is suitable to produce (1) cosmogenic exposure ages from measurement of 10Be and 26Al in quartz, and (2) quality apatite and zircon minerals for (U-Th)/He low temperature thermochronology. The campaign is complementary to the activities of the consortium MAGIC.DML. This sampling will be the second in order to sample those parts from which no samples were acquired in the first season.

Vessels Report
Operational Information - National Expeditions - Vessels
Name: RV Polarstern - General Opertations
Country of Registry: Germany
Number of Voyages: 0
Maximum Crew: 44
Maximum Passengers: 55
Remarks: The research and supply vessel RV POLARSTERN commissioned in 1982 is a high class ice breaking vessel and the major research tool for the German Antarctic program. The advanced scientific and technical equipment and ability to navigate in heavy ice conditions in almost all regions of the Arctic and Antarctic oceans provide ideal working conditions for almost all compartments of marine sciences, atmospheric as well as glaciological research (modernisation from 1998 till 2001). Since 1982 the ship regularly operates in arctic and antarctic waters with an average of 320 days on sea every year. The supply of NEUMAYER STATION III is a regular task. Lifting gears and scientific winches are designed for launching and recovery of devices and sensors, fishing and deep sea sediment probing. Hydro-acoustic survey systems such as Hydrosweep, Parasound and fishery sounders can be continuously operated. The fibre optic network connects bridge, winch control room, laboratories and all scientific working places with several servers and distributes information of the central data acquisition system. Altogether 24 scientific laboratories, aquarium and refrigerating rooms are placed at disposal. Additionally up to 15 mobile laboratory containers can be installed inside the ship on E-Deck (10) and at F-Deck (5). The weather station records meteorological data and provides forecast information and satellite imagery on sea ice distributions. Recently technical facilities and hydro-acoustic navigation aids have been installed to deploy ROV for deep sea missions. Overview on the major elements for marine research: Working Deck Areas and laboratories: • After Deck: 40 m long, 14 m width (partly fixed installations), 560 sq m • Helicopter Deck: 18 m X 15 m. Winch Systems: • A-Frame (30 to) at after deck • 2 traction winches (pull 30 to) • 2 hydrographical winches (pull 5 to), armoured coaxial cable (11 mm, length 7000 m) • 1 hydrographical winch (pull 5 to), armoured coaxial cable (18 mm, length 8000 m) • 2 geological winches (pull 20 to), wire (18 mm, length 10.000 m) • 1 cantilevered beam (5 to) • 1 cantilevered beam (20 to). Cranes: • Bow deck main crane (25 to, 25 m forward) • Midships crane (15 to at 16 m and 10 to at 24 m) • After deck crane, port, 5 to at 18 m. Scientific instrumentation and IT: • fibre optic based 100 MB network, 200 TP, RJ45 ports and 800 fibre optic direct connections • 3 X SISCO 6509 routers • Main computer system, 3 X SUN Enterprise 2500 • 30 PC, display and working PC ( COMPAQ Deskpro 6600) • Data-Logging system: PODAS, about 120 sensors • Atlas Hydrographic DS 2 multibeam swath bathymetry system • Atlas Hydrographics PARASOUND, parametric sub-bottom profiler • SIMRAD Deep Water Sounder (DWS 500), scientific and navigation sounder • SIMRAD EK 60 fishery sounder, four frequencies (38, 70, 120, 200 kHz) • SCANMAR net sonde • Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) • Short Base under Water Navigation System, POSIDONIA 6000 • 2 X SeaBird Thermosalinograph, SBE 21 • 1 X CTD system, SEABIRD SBE 911 Plus, Deck unit SBE 11 Plus and 24 X 12 rosette sampler • XBT-System, Sippican & Nautilus • Ship Magnetometer • Gravimeter • Seismic compressor for air gun, Leobersdorfer, 32 l /minute, 210 bar, air gun handling equipment. • Meteorological observatory including: • Radio Sounding System (VAISALA), data acquisition system, HRPT-Satellite image receiving system. For further information see: http://www.awi.de/en/infrastructure/ships/POLARSTERN/
Name: RV Polarstern - PS117
Country of Registry: Deutschland
Number of Voyages: 0
Maximum Crew: 44
Maximum Passengers: 55
Remarks: Cruise leader: O. Boebel (AWI) HAFOS PI: O. Boebel (AWI) HAFOS (Hybrid Antarctic Float Observing System), investigates the circulation and evolution of Warm Deep Water and Weddell Sea Bottom Water by means of oceanographic deep-sea moorings, hydrographic sections and autonomous floats, the latter of which also extend the international Argo Project to the polar seas. Biological aspects of HAFOS concern the acoustic ecology of the Weddell Sea and its fauna, for which moorings are equipped with autonomous recorders. SIPES2 PI: H. Flores, G. Castellani (AWI) In the Weddell Sea, sea ice constitutes an important foraging ground for krill and other ice-associated fauna, nourishing a rich top predator community. Understanding the trophic role of sea ice at the onset of summer is essential for predictions of the future state of Antarctic ecosystems. The original SIPES expedition (Sea Ice Physics and Ecology Study) was designed as an inter-disciplinary field study focusing on the inter-connection of sea ice physics, sea ice biology, biological oceanography and top predator ecology. Research activities during the SIPES expedition PS89, however, were suspended due to engine damage. SIPES 2 aims to make up for the missed opportunity to collect statistically sound biological datasets during PS89. To achieve this, zooplankton, nekton and oceanographic parameters will be sampled with an under-ice trawl, pelagic nets and sonars, in parallel with top predator censuses. These activities will be complemented by several dedicated sea ice stations, during which the physical and biological properties of sea ice will be investigated using under-ice sensors and ice cores. The outcome of this expedition will serve more precise predictions of future shifts in biodiversity, Antarctic ecosystem functioning, and resource availability. ISOPol PI: M. Werner (AWI) In 2015, a laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS instrument) has been installed on board of Polarstern. This type of instrument is capable of high-precision, high-frequency measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour, and similar instruments have been deployed at various other locations worldwide during the last years. Since the installation of the instrument, automatic, continuous isotope analyses of the atmospheric water vapour evaporated near Polarstern have been conducted and revealed first insights into the role of sea ice on isotopic fractionation during evaporation of oceanic water. In combination with simultaneously performed measurements at different land-based stations (e.g., Iceland, Spitsbergen, Samoylov, and Neumayer III) and complementing climate simulations enhanced by water isotope diagnostics, a combined analyses of data and model results will allow a first-time quantitative assessment of evaporative hydrological processes and their impact on the isotopic variations of water vapour transported within the Antarctic realm. ComiBac PI: J. Piontek (Leibnitz Institute for Baltic Research Warnemünde) Global warming poses new threats to marine ecosystems since rising seawater temperature potentially induces cascading effects in biogeochemical cycles and food webs. The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) identified a better understanding of potential effects of climate change on the physical and biological uptake of CO2 by the Southern Ocean as one of the most pressing tasks in Antarctic research. Heterotrophic bacteria are the main producers of CO2 in the ocean, thereby counteracting the biological drawdown of CO2 by primary production. In Antarctic marine systems, low seawater temperature, and the low availability of labile organic matter are major environmental constraints on bacterial growth and degradation activity. This project aims to test single and combined effects of temperature and organic matter availability on Antarctic marine bacterioplankton. Seawater samples will be collected for the analysis of bacterial activity with emphasis on extracellular enzymes, bacterial cell numbers, the bacterial community composition and concentrations of organic matter (dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved carbohydrates, dissolved amino acids). Furthermore, on-board experiments will investigate combined effects of warming and substrate addition in order to link changes in community composition to changes in community function. Experiments planned for PS117 will be focused on the temperature dependence of polysaccharide degradation by the natural bacterial communities. ALGENOM-2 PI: B. Beszteri (AWI) The Polarstern project “ALGENOM-2” will collect living, fixed and frozen samples of microscopic plankton for research projects exploring the biogeography, diversity, and genomic and functional evolution of diatoms and other phytoplankters of the Southern Ocean. Microscopic plankton communities will be sampled using phytoplankton nets, Niskin bottles and the on board seawater supply system of Polarstern across the Antarctic Cirumpolar Current and in the Weddell Sea. Back in the home laboratory, 18S rDNA amplicon sequencing and community transcriptome sequencing will be applied to characterize the distribution of phytoplankton organisms and their functional (transcriptional) traits across a temperature gradient from the Northern ACC into the Weddell Sea. Using comparative/population genomic and laboratory experimentation analysis, the hypothesis will be tested that broadly distributed phytoplankters of the Southern Ocean have developed local adaptations at the intra- and interspecific levels to the specific environmental characteristics of their habitats. This project represents a continuation and deepening of our previous sampling campaign on board Polarstern during expedition PS103. Toothfish Ecology PI: Magnus Lucassen The Antarctic toothfish Dissostichus mawsoni is a mesopredator in the Antarctic marine food web. It feeds mainly on the silverfish Pleuragramma antarctica (and thereby is a trophic competitor of penguins for it) and is the prey of larger predators (e.g. seals, killer whales). The toothfish has a commercial value worth hundreds of dollars per kg and is therefore the target of an economically relevant fishery in the Southern Ocean (Hanchet et al. 2015). Current Antarctic fisheries management by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR, www.ccamlr.org) largely depends on mathematical models to determine catch rates, but these models frequently fail in the absence of adequate and accurate biological and physical data. After 20 years of the fishery experiencing very high yields, still little is known about the biology of toothfish and this lack of knowledge impinges on the sound management of the species. The fishery is not the only factor potentially affecting the abundance and health of toothfish populations. Climate change –– water temperature rise, ocean acidification, changes to sea ice and oceanographic patterns –– have the potential to affect the entire Antarctic ecosystem, altering food and light availability and causing physiological stress. Physiological stress may have synergistic negative effects on species already facing habitat reduction due to warming. Although currently only the Western Antarctic is facing dramatic climate change. Recent results from IPCC-scenario simulations reveal a pronounced sensitivity of the south-eastern Weddell Sea to projected environmental changes (Hellmer et al. 2012). Accordingly, basal melting of the shelf ice may induce large-scale shifts in water masses and temperature distribution, including increased PCO2 with inflow of melting water and “warm” bottom water reaching the shelf. These quite small shifts in temperature may have significant influence on animal performance of highly cold-adapted species like D. mawsoni and thus consequences for species abundance and distribution. The cold-adapted toothfish is exposed to both climate change and fishery pressure and thus may require additional management and conservation measures to minimize the effects of environmental changes and human impact (Griffiths et al. 2017). There are proposed measures to protect, conserve and limit the fishery of this species. The fishery of D. mawsoni in the Ross Sea will be partially closed starting 1st December 2017 when the (largest in the world) Marine Protected Area (MPA) will take effect. A proposal for an MPA in the Weddell Sea has been prepared by Germany and recently proposed by the EU under the CCAMLR.

Name: RV Polarstern - PS118
Country of Registry: Deutschland
Number of Voyages: 0
Maximum Crew: 44
Maximum Passengers: 55
Remarks: Cruise leader: B. Dorschel (AWI) During Expedition PS118 with the German ice breaker RV Polarstern hydroacoustic measurement of the seafloor will be performed. The analyses will be done with the permanently installed multibeam echosounder Teledyne Atlas Hydrosweep DS3 and the Teledyne Atlas sediment echosounder Parasound PS70. Hydroacoustic data will be recorded during transit and surveying. No echosounder will be operated during station work. Temperature measurements for geothermal heat flow estimates PI: R. Dziadek (AWI) The thermal state of polar continental crust plays a crucial role for understanding the stability and height of large ice sheets, the visco-elastic response of the solid-Earth due to unloading, when large ice caps melt and, in turn, the accuracy of future sea level rise prediction. The scientific community repeatedly outlined the importance of better constrained boundary conditions to enhance the accuracy ice sheet model performance for future sea level rise predictions. Regional GHF estimates are based on crustal heat production in the onshore area of the Antarctic Peninsula [Burton-Johnson et al., 2017] and indicate spatial variabilities. Furthermore, locally elevated GHF due to volcanic activity e.g. in the vicinity of James Ross island, could contribute to a latent instability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in this region. We plan to deploy miniaturized temperature logger mounted on either a 7 meter long probe or the gravity corer to monitor the water column temperature profile and in-situ sediment temperatures. ISOPol PI: M. Werner (AWI) In 2015, a laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS instrument) has been installed on board of Polarstern. This type of instrument is capable of high-precision, high-frequency measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour, and similar instruments have been deployed at various other locations worldwide during the last years. Since the installation of the instrument, automatic, continuous isotope analyses of the atmospheric water vapour evaporated near Polarstern have been conducted and revealed first insights into the role of sea ice on isotopic fractionation during evaporation of oceanic water. In combination with simultaneously performed measurements at different land-based stations (e.g., Iceland, Spitsbergen, Samoylov, and Neumayer III) and complementing climate simulations enhanced by water isotope diagnostics, a combined analyses of data and model results will allow a first-time quantitative assessment of evaporative hydrological processes and their impact on the isotopic variations of water vapour transported within the Antarctic realm. Marine Geology Western Weddell Sea PI: J. Mueller (AWI) Understanding the dynamics of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is a major objective of many research studies focusing on the assessment and prediction of sea level changes associated with the decay of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. For a proper evaluation of the potential links between the recently observed collapse of the Larsen Ice Shelf in the western Weddell Sea and modern climate warming, marine sediment cores are required that provide insight into past responses of this climate sensitive area to climate fluctuations. Main objectives of these studies target at the reconstruction and dating of late Pleistocene changes in the extent of the Larsen Ice Shelf. In this context, it is of pivotal importance to assess the impact of changes in ocean temperature and sea ice coverage on the stability of the Larsen Ice Shelf. A further research topic concerns the role that the ice shelf as well as sea ice played for the formation of Antarctic bottom water – a driving mechanism of the global thermohaline circulation. In this context direct water sampling will be carried out to map various shelf and deeper water masses in the working area in order to establish a new powerful water mass tracer for paleoclimatic purposes in the western Weddell Sea. The main part of the expedition’s work program accordingly includes the collection of sediment cores, which permit reconstructing Holocene and last glacial ice-shelf dynamics as well as ocean properties (temperature, sea ice, bottom water). In addition to the longer gravity cores, short sediment cores and water samples will be collected and investigated to improve and develop (organic) geochemical proxies for Southern Ocean paleoceanographic reconstructions. As a last add-on, hopefully several short (~1 m) sea ice or shelf ice cores can be obtained from colleagues on board to gauge the anthropogenic atmospherically transported lead input into the study area and compare this input to natural sedimentary lead signatures. Benthic ecology and habitat mapping with towed camera and acoustic sled PI: A. Purser (AWI) During Expedition PS118 with the German ice breaker RV Polarstern seafloor image and video data will be collected with a towed sled flown 2 – 4 m above the seafloor. Concurrently, a multibeam sidescan system (EdgeTech 2205 AUV/ROV MPES (multiphase echosounder) will be used to collect high resolution seafloor surface bathymetry data over a swathe of ~80 m diameter. These data will be combined to produce habitat and fauna maps of from the surveyed locations. WedIce PI: C. Haas, S. Arndt (AWI) The sea-ice physics’ project on “Sea ice properties and processes in the western Weddell Sea” (WedIce) during PS118 aims to continue ice thickness observations and radar remote sensing and to compare them with results from earlier cruises to detect and quantify potential change. The thickness of different ice regimes will also be related to different oceanic regimes with different magnitudes of ocean heat flux (Hellmer et al., 2011). Due to the timing of PS118 in February to April, results will represent end-of-summer minimum ice conditions and will help to explain the area and amount of ice surviving the summer. This will provide important background information on the state of sea ice in the Weddell Sea and the reasons for its long-term changes. As the ship will pass from the open water through the MIZ into the closed pack ice zone it will also be possible to observe meridional and zonal gradients of ice thinning and snow melt representing the changing influence of atmospheric and oceanic melt processes (Rabenstein et al., 2010). Another important component of the sea ice mass balance is the accumulation and metamorphism of snow (Massom et al., 2001; Haas et al., 2001). Thaw-freeze events and snow metamorphism can be detected by satellite microwave observations (Haas, 2001; Arndt et al., 2016), thus providing valuable insights into the timing and change of melt onset related to changing atmospheric conditions. Melt onset is also related to ice thickness because earlier and stronger surface melt will accelerate overall thinning. During PS118, we plan to validate satellite microwave retrievals of metamorphic snow and to investigate if regional gradients in the intensity of metamorphism can be detected by satellite microwave sensors. One consequence of downward heat flux and snow thaw is the percolation of melt water to the snow-ice interface and the formation of gap layers, continuous or highly porous layers in the upper ice filled with seawater or slush and high amounts of algae and other micro-organisms (Thomas et al., 1998; Haas et al., 2001; Kattner et al., 2004; Ackley et al., 2008). The relationships between the thickness and biomass and other biogeochemical properties of gap layers and the overlying superimposed ice and degree of snow metamorphism have never been investigated. Therefore, the WedIce projects aims to focus also on such interdisciplinary studies, given that we expect strong gradients in experienced melt conditions during summer across the marginal ice zone. Moreover, the western Weddell Sea is characterized by the presence of fast ice located in inlets and bays adjacent to the Larsen ice shelves. Some of this fast ice can survive several summers and then cause reductions of iceberg calving and stabilization of glaciers (Rott et al., 2017). The fast ice is also of interest because it can accumulate platelet ice, an indicator for the presence of Ice Shelf Water and therefore of ice shelf bottom melt (Langhorne et al., 2016). We therefore aim in the WedIce project to observe the thickness of fast ice where it has survived the summer, the role of snow for summer survival, and the presence of platelet ice within and under the fast ice. Of particular interest are the fast ice in the Larsen B embayment and between the Larsen C ice shelf and iceberg A-68. Bentho-Pelagic Processes PI: C. Richter (AWI) The aim of the project is to assess the structure and dynamics of the seafloor communities in the formerly iceshelf-covered areas east of the Antarctic Peninsula, where strong regional warming has led to the disintegration of the ice-shelves in 1995 (Larsen A), 2002 (Larsen B), and the calving of the giant iceberg A-68 in 2017 (Larsen C), leading to the successive exposure of iceshelf cavity benthos to cryo-pelagic production. The project is part of a series of investigations initiated in 2007 to explore how the Antarctic benthos responds to these dramatic changes. Oceanographic processes in the Western Weddell Sea PI: M. Janout (AWI) The aim of the project is to assess the hydrography, water masses and water mass transformation processes in the western Weddell Sea shelf and continental slope region. Strong regional warming has led to the disintegration of the ice-shelves in 1995 (Larsen A), 2002 (Larsen B), and the calving of the giant iceberg A-68 in 2017 (Larsen C). The decay of these ice shelves has likely profound implications for glaciers, ice sheet dynamics and ocean circulation along the East Antarctic Peninsula, and therefore the project aims at mapping the distribution and pathways of water masses and at assessing the contribution of ice shelf-ocean interaction to the ice shelf retreat. Ecological investigation of seafloor fauna and function on the west Weddell Sea continental shelf and slope - one of the least explored Antarctic regions subjected to recent climate-induced ice shelf collapse PI: H. Link (University Rostock) Following the recent calving from the Larsen C Shelf the seafloor underneath the former ice-covered area can be assumed to start undergoing previously observed changes from Larsen A and B. It is not known if and how this development influences the processes at the seafloor, the benthic functions. For a comprehensive understanding of ecosystem functioning it is, hence, necessary to determine the role of different ecosystem components. Our focus is on the effect of macrofauna and meiofauna on seafloor processes in areas having lost ice-shelf cover at different times. Few studies have investigated different size classes and communities of organisms, like meio- and macrofauna, in this benthic environment simultaneously. And on the Southern Ocean shelves, none has studied their complementary role for benthic remineralisation and bioirrigation. Influences of reduced or changing ice cover on trophic interactions among and the relative importance of meio- and macrofauna taxa are not understood. How benthic boundary fluxes (nitrate, phosphate, silicic acid, oxygen) and bioirrigation are affected by ice-shelf loss in the Weddell Sea is unknown. And virtually nothing is known about the partitioning of organic matter remineralisation between the meiobenthic and macrobenthic community compartment in the Southern Ocean. During the PS118 expedition, we intend to study the role of macro- and meiofauna for benthic processes. The trophic interaction between macro- and meiofauna using stable isotopes will be studied in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aberdeen (TABOSI, Witte & Makela). The objectives for this expedition are: 1. Quantify benthic remineralisation and bioirrigation in Larsen area with and without ice-shelf loss (reference) 2. Determine the effect of meio- vs macrofauna (and organic matter input) on benthic remineralisation and bioirrigation in a) ice-shelf loss affected and b) reference sites 3. Determine the trophic interaction of meio- and macrofauna in areas affected by ice-shelf loss

Aircrat Report
Operational Information - National Expeditions - Aircraft
Type: Helicopter service
Category: Local helicopter flights
Period From: 24/12/2018
Period To: 30/04/2019
Remarks: PI: E. Herr (HeliService International) Helicopter service during PS117 and PS118 PS117: 228 h PS118: 150 h
Type: Polar 6 operation
Category: Intracontinental flights
Period From: 27/10/2018
Period To: 20/01/2019
Remarks: Begin End Project 27/Oct 20/Jan ANT 2018/19 116 days 27/Oct 03/Nov Ferry to Falkland Islands 04/Nov 06/Nov Installation of grav-mag systems, FI 07/Nov 25/Nov AIRLAFONIA, FI 26/Nov 27/Nov De-installation of grav-mag systems , FI 28/Nov 02/Dec Ferry FI – Novo 03/Dec 05/Dec Installation of EM-Bird at Novo 06/Dec Ferry Novo – Neumayer 07/Dec 15/Dec CAPIS (3 flights Neumayer + 3 flights Halley) Monitoring snow accumulation Neumayer 16/Dec 21/Dec Installation of UWB at Neumayer 22/Dec 08/Jan JuRaS, Troll & CHIRP, Novo & PES 09/Jan 10/Jan De-installation at Neumayer 11/Jan 20/Jan Ferry to Calgary Departure might be delayed by 1 week for VIP activities
Type: Polar 6 science
Category: Intracontinental flights
Period From: 02/12/2018
Period To: 20/01/2019
Remarks: PI: D. Steinhage (AWI) CAPIS (PI: C. Haas, AWI) The Antarctic sea ice cover plays an important role in the Antarctic climate and eco system, and is closely linked to ice-ocean interaction processes under ice shelves. We propose to carry out an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of pack ice and fast ice thickness in the eastern Weddell Sea in order to observe the state of sea ice in this region of the Antarctic, and to quantify the amount of ice exported from small polynyas along the coast. In addition, we will map the occurrence and thickness of the platelet layer under the fast ice. This layer bears information about the presence of supercooled water originating from the bottom melt of ice shelves. It therefore provides the possibility to study variations in ice shelf bottom melt without the need to directly access that environment. The presence and thickness of the sub-ice platelet layer can be retrieved from AEM measurements. Results will provide a new view of ice shelf bottom melt processes in the Eastern Weddell Sea and will inform future glaciological, oceanographic, and biological studies in this region. JuRaS (PI: D. Jansen) Ice streams provide the most efficient drainage of ice into the sea (e. g. Alley et al., 2005). They are highly dynamic systems, sensitive to changes in boundary conditions at their outlets or at their base. The consequences of changes at the outlets, e.g. due to ocean warming, can reach far upstream, as has been observed for the Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica (Joughin et al., 2010). The temporal and spatial variability of ice streams is currently not well understood, and thus these rapid dynamic changes are not well represented in large scale models used to predict future sea level rise (Alley et al., 2005). The ice streams not only leave their imprint on the surface, but also show up within radar-mapped stratigraphy of the ice sheets. They leave their associated structures buried in the ice to reveal their former pres

Research Rockets Report
Military
Vessel-Based Report
Operational Information - Non Governmental Expeditions - Vessel-Based Operations
Operator:
Name: Hanse Explorer GmbH & Co KG
Contact Address: Hermann-Hollerith-Str. 10, 28355 Bremen
Email Address: HanseExplorer@hp-shipping.de
Website Address:
Name of Vessel: Hanse Explorer
Country of Registry: Antigua and Barbuda
Number of Voyages:
Maximum Crew: 28
Maximum Passengers: 12
Remarks: 8 Voyages along the Antarctic Peninsula
Voyages:  
Depart. Date Depart. Port Arrival Date Arrival Port Expedition Leader
13 Dec 2018 Ushuaia, Argentina 20 Dec 2018 King George Island, Antarctica

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Great Wall Station Latitude: 62º 13´ 00´´ S Longitude: 58º 57´ 00´´ W
Visit Date16/12/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
ActivitiesSmall Boat Landing, Station Visit
Duration of landing
Site Name: Antarctic Sound Latitude: 63°26´S Longitude: 56°39´W
Visit Date17/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Weddell Sea Latitude: 72°00´S Longitude: 45°00´W
Visit Date18/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cierva Cove Latitude: 64º 09´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 53´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
20 Dec 2018 King George Island, Antarctica 30 Dec 2018 King George Island, Antarctica

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Antarctic Sound Latitude: 63°26´S Longitude: 56°39´W
Visit Date21/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Weddell Sea Latitude: 72°00´S Longitude: 45°00´W
Visit Date22/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cierva Cove Latitude: 64º 09´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 53´ 00´´ W
Visit Date23/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Trinity Island Latitude: 63°45´S Longitude: 60°44´W
Visit Date24/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island/Jougla Point & Goudier Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date25/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: The Gullet Latitude: 67º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 67º 38´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wilhelmina Bay Latitude: 64°38´S Longitude: 62°04´W
Visit Date27/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 39´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Antarctic Sound Latitude: 63°26´S Longitude: 56°39´W
Visit Date29/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
30 Dec 2018 King George Island, Antarctica 06 Jan 2019 King George Island, Antarctica

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Trinity Island Latitude: 63°45´S Longitude: 60°44´W
Visit Date31/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island/Jougla Point & Goudier Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date02/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cierva Cove Latitude: 64º 09´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 53´ 00´´ W
Visit Date03/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 39´ 00´´ W
Visit Date04/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 58´ 00´´ W
Visit Date05/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
08 Jan 2019 King George Island, Antarctica 14 Jan 2019 King George Island, Antarctica

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Brown Bluff Latitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 56º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date09/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Weddell Sea Latitude: 72°00´S Longitude: 45°00´W
Visit Date10/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Trinity Island Latitude: 63°45´S Longitude: 60°44´W
Visit Date11/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island/Jougla Point & Goudier Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date12/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 16´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 16´ 00´´ W
Visit Date13/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
14 Jan 2019 King George Island, Antarctica 22 Jan 2019 King George Island, Antarctica

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Brown Bluff Latitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 56º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date15/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Weddell Sea Latitude: 72º 00´ 00´´ S Longitude: 45º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date16/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Trinity Island Latitude: 63°45´S Longitude: 60°44´W
Visit Date17/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island/Jougla Point & Goudier Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Crystal Sound Latitude: 66°23´S Longitude: 66°30´W
Visit Date20/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Antarctic Sound Latitude: 63°26´S Longitude: 56°39´W
Visit Date21/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
27 Jan 2019 Punta Arenas, Chile 07 Feb 2019 Punta Arenas, Chile
09 Feb 2019 Punta Arenas, Chile 21 Feb 2019 Punta Arenas, Chile
22 Feb 2019 Punta Arenas, Chile 04 Mar 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Antarctic Sound Latitude: 63°26´S Longitude: 56°39´W
Visit Date26/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Crystal Sound Latitude: 66°23´S Longitude: 66°30´W
Visit Date27/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Brown Bluff Latitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 56º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/03/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Weddell Sea Latitude: 69°00´S Longitude: 42°00´W
Visit Date02/03/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: King George Island Latitude: 62º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 58º 50´ 00´´ W
Visit Date03/03/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing

Operator:
Name: Hapag-Lloyd Kreuzfahrten GmbH
Contact Address: Ballindamm 25, D-20095 Hamburg, Germany
Email Address:
Website Address:
Name of Vessel: MS Bremen
Country of Registry: Nassau/Bahamas
Number of Voyages:
Maximum Crew: 105
Maximum Passengers: 164
Remarks: Four journeys to the Antarctic Peninsula.
Voyages:  
Depart. Date Depart. Port Arrival Date Arrival Port Expedition Leader
17 Dec 2018 Punta Arenas, Chile 04 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Base Orcadas Latitude: 60°44´19´´S Longitude: 44°44´16´´W
Visit Date27/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Point Wild Latitude: 61º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 54º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paulet Island Latitude: 63º 35´ 00´´ S Longitude: 55º 47´ 00´´ W
Visit Date29/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Aitcho Islands Latitude: 62º 24´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 47´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Peterman Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 05´ 00´´ W
Visit Date31/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 52´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date31/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neko Harbour Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 31´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
04 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina 22 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Orcadas Station  Latitude:  Longitude: 
Visit Date14/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Point Wild Latitude: 61º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 54º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date15/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paulet Island Latitude: 63º 35´ 00´´ S Longitude: 55º 47´ 00´´ W
Visit Date16/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay/Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date17/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date17/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Peterman Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 05´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Damoy Point/Dorian Bay Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 52´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neko Harbour Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 31´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
22 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina 10 Feb 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Orcadas Station Latitude: 60º 73´ 00´´ S Longitude: 44º 73´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Point Wild Latitude: 61º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 54º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date02/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Brown Bluff Latitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 56º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date03/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Devil Island Latitude: 63º 47´ 00´´ S Longitude: 57º 18´ 00´´ W
Visit Date03/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: James Ross Island Latitude: 63º 48´ 00´´ S Longitude: 57º 53´ 00´´ W
Visit Date04/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date05/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date05/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date06/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Damoy Point Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ W
Visit Date06/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 52´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date06/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neko Harbour Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 31´ 00´´ W
Visit Date07/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date07/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
10 Feb 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina 01 Mar 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Marguerite Bay Latitude: 68°30´S Longitude: 68°30´W
Visit Date24/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Orcadas Latitude: 60º 45´ 00´´ S Longitude: 44º 44´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Point Wild Latitude: 61º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 54º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay, Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 39´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date21/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 52´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date21/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Hanusse Bay Latitude: 66°57´S Longitude: 67°30´W
Visit Date22/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Prospect Point Latitude: 66°00´S Longitude: 65°21´W
Visit Date22/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Horseshoe Island Latitude: 67º 49´ 48´´ S Longitude: 67º 14´ 18´´ W
Visit Date23/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Stonington Base Latitude: 68º 18´ 00´´ S Longitude: 67º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date24/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neko Harbor Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 33´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing

Operator:
Name: PLANTOURS Kreuzfahrten / plantours & Partner GmbH
Contact Address: Martinistraße 50-52, 28195 Bremen
Email Address: dartsch@plantours-kreuzfahrten.de
Website Address:
Name of Vessel: MS Hamburg
Country of Registry: Bahamas
Number of Voyages:
Maximum Crew: 182
Maximum Passengers: 360
Remarks: Three cruise trips to the Antarctic Peninsula.
Voyages:  
Depart. Date Depart. Port Arrival Date Arrival Port Expedition Leader
14 Dec 2018 Rio de Janeiro, Brasil 03 Jan 2019 Ushuaia

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Bransfield Strait Latitude: 63°00´S Longitude: 59°00´W
Visit Date27/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay - Deception Island Latitude: 62º 95´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 63´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neko Harbor Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 33´ 00´´ W
Visit Date29/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date29/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Lemaire Channel Latitude: 65°05´S Longitude: 63°59´W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Neumayer Channel Latitude: 64°47´S Longitude: 63°30´W
Visit Date30/12/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
03 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina 14 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Arctowski Station Latitude: 62°09´45´´S Longitude: 58°28´W
Visit Date06/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Deception Island, Telefon Bay Latitude: 62º 56´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 40´ 00´´ W
Visit Date07/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Yankee Harbour Latitude: 62º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 47´ 00´´ W
Visit Date07/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Station Latitude: 64º 89´ 43´´ S Longitude: 62º 87´ 15´´ W
Visit Date08/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date09/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date09/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date10/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
14 Jan 2019 Ushuaia, Argentina 30 Jan 2019 Valparaiso, Chile

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Arctowski Station Latitude: 62°09´45´´S Longitude: 58°28´W
Visit Date17/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Half Moon Island Latitude: 62º 36´ 00´´ S Longitude: 59º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Whalers Bay - Deception Island Latitude: 62º 95´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 63´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Station Latitude: 64º 89´ 43´´ S Longitude: 62º 87´ 15´´ W
Visit Date19/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cape Renard Latitude: 65º 01´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 48´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing

Operator:
Name: Prof. Michael Adlkofer
Contact Address: Parallelstraße 18, 12209 Berlin
Email Address: britta@adlkofer.de
Website Address:
Name of Vessel: SV Vera
Country of Registry: Germany
Number of Voyages:
Maximum Crew: 2
Maximum Passengers: 2
Remarks: Private sailing trip to Antarctica
Voyages:  
Depart. Date Depart. Port Arrival Date Arrival Port Expedition Leader
01 Jan 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile 15 Feb 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile Britta Adlkofer

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 39´ 00´´ W
Visit Date04/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Trinity Island Latitude: 63°45´S Longitude: 60°44´W
Visit Date08/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Enterprise Island Latitude: 64º 32´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date10/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date14/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 52´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date16/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Lautaro Island Latitude: 64°49´S Longitude: 63°06´W
Visit Date18/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Harbour Latitude: 64°51´S Longitude: 62°54´W
Visit Date20/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Pleneau Island Latitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ W
Visit Date22/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Petermann Island Latitude: 65º 10´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 10´ 00´´ W
Visit Date24/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Winter Island Latitude: 65º 15´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 16´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Charcot Latitude: 65º 04´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island, Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 23´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/01/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island/Dorian Bay, Damoy Point Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 32´ 00´´ W
Visit Date02/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Dallmann Bay Latitude: 64°20´S Longitude: 62°55´W
Visit Date04/02/2019
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing

Operator:
Name: Wolf Kloss, Turismo SIM Ltd
Contact Address: Calle Maragaño 168, P.O. Box 6, Puerto Williams, XII Region, Chile
Email Address: base@simexpeditions.com
Website Address:
Name of Vessel: S/Y Santa Maria Australis
Country of Registry: Berlin, Germany
Number of Voyages:
Maximum Crew: 2
Maximum Passengers: 9
Remarks: 4 Voyages along the Antarctic Peninsula.
Voyages:  
Depart. Date Depart. Port Arrival Date Arrival Port Expedition Leader
10 Nov 2018 Puerto Williams, Chile 01 Dec 2018 Puerto Williams, Chile Daniel Holleis

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Deception Island, Telefon Bay Latitude: 62º 56´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 40´ 00´´ W
Visit Date15/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Foyn Harbour Latitude: 64º 55´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 02´ 00´´ W
Visit Date16/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date17/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Waterboat Point Latitude: 64°49´S Longitude: 62°51´W
Visit Date18/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Latitude: 64º 54´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 54´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Charcot Latitude: 65º 04´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Pleneau Island Latitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ W
Visit Date21/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Galindez Island Latitude: 65°15´S Longitude: 64°15´W
Visit Date22/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date23/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Dorian Bay Latitude: 64°49´S Longitude: 63°30´W
Visit Date24/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Dallmann Bay Latitude: 64°20´S Longitude: 62°55´W
Visit Date25/11/2018
This visit includes landingNo  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
26 Dec 2018 Puerto Williams, Chile 16 Jan 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Deception Island Latitude: 62º 59´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 39´ 00´´ W
Visit Date23/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Enterprise Island Latitude: 64°32´S Longitude: 62°00´W
Visit Date24/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date25/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Paradise Bay Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Station Latitude: 64º 89´ 43´´ S Longitude: 62º 87´ 15´´ W
Visit Date27/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Charcot Latitude: 65º 04´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Pleneau Island Latitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ W
Visit Date29/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Argentine Islands Latitude: 65°15´S Longitude: 64°16´W
Visit Date30/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Goudier Island Latitude: 64º 83´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 50´ 00´´ W
Visit Date31/12/2017
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 17´ 00´´ W
Visit Date01/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Melchior Islands Latitude: 64°19´S Longitude: 62°57´W
Visit Date02/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
21 Jan 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile 11 Feb 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Deception Island, Telefon Bay Latitude: 62º 56´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 40´ 00´´ W
Visit Date20/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors12
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Foyn Harbour Latitude: 64º 55´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 02´ 00´´ W
Visit Date21/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors12
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date22/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Waterboat Point Latitude: 64°49´S Longitude: 62°51´W
Visit Date23/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Latitude: 64º 54´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date24/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Charcot Latitude: 65º 04´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date25/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Pleneau Island Latitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 04´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Galindez Island, Argentine Islands Archipelago, Antarctic Peninsula Latitude: 65º 15´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 15´ 00´´ W
Visit Date27/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date28/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 17´ 00´´ W
Visit Date29/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
Site Name: Dallmann Bay Latitude: 64º 20´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date30/01/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities
Duration of landing
16 Feb 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile 09 Mar 2019 Puerto Williams, Chile

Visited Sites:  View in Google Earth Map
Site Name: Deception Island, Telefon Bay Latitude: 62º 56´ 00´´ S Longitude: 60º 40´ 00´´ W
Visit Date17/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Foyn Harbour Latitude: 64º 55´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 02´ 00´´ W
Visit Date18/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Cuverville Island Latitude: 64º 41´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 34´ 00´´ W
Visit Date19/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Waterboat Point Latitude: 64°49´S Longitude: 62°51´W
Visit Date20/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Almirante Brown Latitude: 64º 54´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 52´ 00´´ W
Visit Date21/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Charcot Latitude: 65º 04´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 00´ 00´´ W
Visit Date22/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Pleneau Island Latitude: 65º 06´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 04´ 00´´ W
Visit Date23/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Galindez Island, Argentine Islands Archipelago, Antarctic Peninsula Latitude: 65º 15´ 00´´ S Longitude: 64º 16´ 00´´ W
Visit Date24/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Port Lockroy Latitude: 64º 49´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 30´ 00´´ W
Visit Date25/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Wiencke Island Latitude: 64º 50´ 00´´ S Longitude: 63º 17´ 00´´ W
Visit Date26/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing
Site Name: Dallmann Bay Latitude: 64º 20´ 00´´ S Longitude: 62º 55´ 00´´ W
Visit Date27/02/2018
This visit includes landingYes  Number of visitors
Activities: 
Duration of landing

Land-Based Operations
Operational Information - Non Governmental Expeditions - Land-Based Operations
Expedition Name: Documentary Neumayer Station III for TV production 
Method of transportation to/within/from Antarctica: Aircraft Flight
Activities: Aircraft Flight, Media, Station Visit
Number of Participants: 2
Date begin: 16 Nov 2018
Date end: 28 Nov 2018
Number of personnel: 2
Operator:
Name: ProSiebenSat 1 TV Deutschland GmbH
Contact Address: Medienallee 7, 85774 Unterföhring
Email Address: matthias.gonser@prosiebensat1.com
Website Address:
Remarks: The aim of the project is a documentary of the research activities at Neumayer Station III for the reportage magazine "Galileo" on ProSieben in order to raise the public's awareness of the Antarctic, the work there and its significance. For this purpose, filming should be carried out in and around the station. In addition, the project of the German Aerospace Center e.V. (DLR), the greenhouse "Eden ISS" near the Neumayer Station III, will be presented. A drone should also be used to show the Neumayer Station III, the Observatories, the "EDEN ISS" container and the researchers (over short distances) from different perspectives. The film crew consists of two persons, Mr. Matthias Gonser (responsible for the project) and Mr. Patrik Ilg (cameraman).
Location of Activities
Neumayer Station III
Routes:
Expedition Name: Drone operation for photo and video recording along the Antarctic Peninsula  
Method of transportation to/within/from Antarctica: MV Ortelius
Activities: Aircraft Flight, Media
Number of Participants: 3
Date begin: 15 Nov 2018
Date end: 30 Nov 2018
Number of personnel:
Operator:
Name: WIRODIVE Tauch- und Erlebnisreisen GmbH, Robert Wilpernig
Contact Address: Stadtgraben 17, 85368 Moosburg/Isar
Email Address: wilpernig@wirodive.de
Website Address: www.wirodive.de
Remarks: Drone operation is only permitted on land and not from bord the MV Ortelius. Drone operation is not permitted near any concentration of wildlife.
Location of Activities
Routes: Deception Island, Greenwich Island, Beak Island und Snow Hill Island or other locations within the route of MV Ortelius during OTL23-18.

Denial of Authorizations
Area Protection and Management Report
Environmental Information - Area Protection and Management
ASPA: Number:  125    Name:  Fildes Peninsula, King George Island (25 de Mayo) (More Details)
Permit Number: II 2.8 - 94033/143
Number of people permitted: 4
Permit Period: From:  20 Nov 2018   To:  05 Mar 2019
Purpose: Counting, handling and measuring penguins and skuas on foot by Hans-Ulrich Peter and colleaques (University of Jena, Germany)
Summary of activities:
Event or project name/number: Fildes Peninsula Expedition 2018/2019
ASPA: Number:  150    Name:  Ardley Island, Maxwell Bay, King George Island (25 de Mayo) (More Details)
Permit Number: II 2.8 - 94033/143
Number of people permitted: 4
Permit Period: From:  20 Nov 2018   To:  05 Mar 2019
Purpose: Counting, handling and measuring penguins and skuas on foot by Hans-Ulrich Peter and colleaques (University of Jena, Germany)
Summary of activities:
Event or project name/number: Fildes Peninsula Expedition 2018/2019
ASPA: Number:  163    Name:  Dakshin Gangotri Glacier, Dronning Maud Land (More Details)
Permit Number: II 2.8 - 94033/120
Number of people permitted: 0
Permit Period: From:  01 Nov 2018   To:  14 Feb 2019
Purpose: In case of unavoidable and unintentional flying above the ASPA during flight survey via airplane (POLAR 5 or POLAR 6; PI: Daniel Steinhage, AWI)
Summary of activities:
Event or project name/number: Aerophysical measurements and remote sensing 2018/2019
ASPA: Number:  171    Name:  Narebski Point, Barton Peninsula, King George Island (More Details)
Permit Number: II 2.8 - 94033/143
Number of people permitted: 4
Permit Period: From:  20 Nov 2018   To:  05 Mar 2019
Purpose: Counting, handling and measuring penguins and skuas on foot by Hans-Ulrich Peter and colleaques (University of Jena, Germany)
Summary of activities:
Event or project name/number: Fildes Peninsula Expedition 2018/2019
Aircrat Report
General Report